Transcription Notes: This material was published as an appendix to a more general work, but independently numbered as a stand-alone booklet. The front-matters, including a very brief extract from the Preface, are from the more expansive work, but the second title page and the remainder of the text is from the song-book portion only of the larger work.

This Internet file is not an exact copy of the book. Certain liberties have been taken. It is presented here as a collection of poetry, rather than as songs to be sung. Some of the conventions helpful for singing, such as breaking words into syllables and heavy use of apostrophes for elided 'e's and 'v's, were felt unnecessary and distracting, so many of the 'v's and practically all of the vowels that were apostrophized out have been replaced (except in the Robert Burns poems, where their purpose is to simulate a Scot dialect). While choruses are noted, repeating lines have otherwise been left out. A very few spellings have been modernized, and typographic errors corrected.

If you wish to view the original material, a photo-reproduction of the book is available at http://books.google.com/books?id=rN02AAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA1, with the final digits (1 in this example) replaced by the page number you want. It can also be downloaded as a PDF file from that URL.

There are 18 poems in this collection. The pages of the songbook section were numbered from 1, for the title page immediately following p.398 in the Freemason's Monitor, to 15, for the text of the final song, and was followed by several pages of advertisments for other books from the same publisher. It was felt unnecessary to interrupt the flow of the verses to insert page numbers for an Internet file. A Table of Contents has been compiled and added to this file listing only the song titles and numbers, but no page numbers.

We've compiled a first line index with song numbers and hyperlinks. This is at the tail end of this file.

Table Of Contents

ODES for MASONIC OCCASIONS.

SECTION FIRST: OPENING THE LODGE.
1. COME, BROTHERS.
2. THE MASONS' HOME.
3. UNIVERSALITY OF FREEMASONRY.
4. YE HAPPY FEW.
SECTION SECOND: INITIATION.
1. BEHOLD HOW PLEASANT.
2. WHILE JOURNEYING.
SECTION THIRD: PASSING.
1. BROTHERS FAITHFUL.
SECTION FOURTH: RAISING.
1. LET US REMEMBER.
2. SOLEMN STRIKES.
SECTION FIFTH: CLOSING.
1. ONE HOUR WITH YOU.
2. BROTHERS, ERE TO-NIGHT.
3. THE LEVEL AND THE SQUARE.
4. ADIEU! A HEART-WARM.
5. AULD LANG SYNE.
SECTION SIXTH: FUNERAL RITES.
1. WREATHE THE MOURNING BADGE AROUND.
2. PRECIOUS IN THE SIGHT.
3. UNVAIL THY BOSOM.
4. BEAR HIM HOME.

THE

FREEMASON'S MONITOR,

or
ILLUSTRATIONS OF MASONRY,
BY

THOMAS SMITH WEBB.

With Comments and Copious Notes upon the History, Usage and
Jurisprudence of Symbolical Masonry, together with
an Appendix, embracing

a synopsis of Masonic Law,

Forms, Odes and Chronological Tables,

BY ROB MORRIS,

GRAND MASTER,
Author of "Code of Masonic Law," etc., etc., and Compiler
of THE UNIVERSAL MASONIC LIBRARY.


CINCINNATI:
MOORE, WILSTACH, KEYS & CO.,

25 WEST FOURTH STREET,

1859.




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1859,
BY JOHN SHERER,
In the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of Ohio.




TO
JOSEPH DRAPER,
OF
CINCINNATI, OHIO,
A Freemason of long and valued service,
A Citizen of sterling and acknowledged merit,
A Friend with a hand and heart that never slacken
in well-wishing and well-doing,
This Annotated Edition
of
THE FREEMASON' MONITOR
Is Respectfully and Fraternally
DEDICATED.



PREFACE.


In undertaking to edit this republication of the Freemason's Monitor, it is but justice to myself to say that the work has been long in contemplation; the notes, etc., for the most part, were long since prepared. To Mr. John Sherer I have now transferred the materials go long collected and elaborated, and would cordially recommend this laudable effort of his to the Fraternity at large.

The first edition of the Freemason's Monitor was issued at Albany, N. Y., in 1797.

ROB MORRIS.
LOUISVILLE, February, 1859.

ODES

for

MASONIC OCCASIONS.

BY ROB MORRIS AND OTHERS.


ODES

for

MASONIC OCCASIONS.


SECTION FIRST.

OPENING THE LODGE.



I-1. COME, BROTHERS.

by Thomas Power.
Air See Manual of Masonic Music, page 14.*

Come, Brothers of the Craft, unite,
In generous purpose bound;
Let holy love and radiant light
In all our works be found.
Chorus


Where columns rise in beauteous form,
Untouched by time's decay,
We'll fear no dark or threatening storm,
To cloud our passing day.

And as we pass life's journey o'er,
Though trouble's waves may rise,
Our faith shall rest on that bright shore,
Beyond the changing skies,

* The Manual of Masonic Music constitutes the XXIVth Volume of the Universal Masonic Library. It contains 121 Masonic Odes set to music; also a number of Marches and Voluntaries, and 126 Odes unaccompanied with notes.


I-2. THE MASONS' HOME.

by Rob Morris.
Air "Bonny Doon."

Where hearts are warm with kindred fire,
And love beams free from answering eyes,
Bright spirits hover always there,
And that's the home the Masons prize.
The Masons' Home! Ah, peaceful home,
The home of love and light and joy:
How gladly does the Mason come
To share his tender, sweet employ.

All round the world, by land, by sea,
Where Summers burn or Winters chill,
The exiled Mason turns to thee,
And yearns to share the joys we feel.
The Masons' Home! Ah, happy home,
The home of light and love and joy:
There's not an hour but I would come
And share this tender, sweet employ.

A weary task, a dreary round,
Is all benighted man may know,
But here a brighter scene is found,
The brightest scene that's found below.
The Masons' Home! Ah, blissful home,
Glad center of unmingled joy:
Long as I live I'll gladly come
And share this tender, sweet employ.

And when the hour of death shall come,
And darkness seal my closing eye,
May hands fraternal bear me home,
The home where weary Masons' lie.
The Masons' Home! Ah, heavenly home,
To faithful hearts eternal joy:
How blest to find beyond the tomb
The end of all our sweet employ!

I-3. UNIVERSALITY OF FREEMASONRY.

by Rob Morris.
Air "Feast of Roses."

Wherever man is tracing
The weary ways of care,
Midst wild and desert pacing
Or land of softer air,
Chorus

We surely know each other,
And with good words of cheer,
Each Brother hails his Brother,
And Hope wings lightly there.

Wherever tears are falling,
The soul's dark wintery rain,
And human sighs are calling,
To human hearts in vain,
Chorus

We surely know each other, etc.

Wherever prayer is spoken
In earnestness of faith,
We're minded of the token
That tells our Master's death
Chorus

We pray, then, for each other, etc.

Wherever man is lying,
Unknowing and unknown,
There's one yet by the dying,
He shall not die alone;
Chorus

For then we know each other, etc.

I-4. YE HAPPY FEW.

Air See Chase's Masonic Harp, p.22.

Ye happy few who here extend
In peaceful lines, from East to West,
With fervent zeal the Lodge defend,
And lock its secrets in your breast.

Since ye are met upon the Square,
Bid Love and Friendship jointly reign,
Be Peace and Harmony your care,
They form an adamantine chain.



SECTION SECOND.

INITIATION.



II-1. BEHOLD HOW PLEASANT.

by Giles P. Yates.
Air "Auld Lang Syne."

Behold how pleasant and how good
For Brethren such as we,
Of the united Brotherhood,
To dwell in unity.
'Tis like the oil on Aaron's head,
Which to his feet distills,
Like Hermon's dew so richly shed
On Sion's sacred hills.

For there the Lord of Light and Love
A blessing sent with power:
Oh may we all this blessing prove
Even life forever more.
On Friendship's altar, rising here,
Our hands now plighted be,
To live in love with hearts sincere.
In peace and unity.

II-2. WHILE JOURNEYING.

by Thomas Power.
Air Masonic Musical Manual, p. 6.

While journeying on our darksome way,
By love fraternal led,
Supreme Conductor, Thee we pray,
To smooth the path we tread;
No fear shall cross the trusting heart,
In faith reposed above,
No dearer joy can life impart,
Than breathes in words of Love.



SECTION THIRD.

PASSING.



III-1. BROTHERS FAITHFUL.

by Hercules Ellis.
Air Masonic Musical Manual, p. 8.

Brothers faithful and deserving
Now the second rank you fill,
Purchased by your faultless serving,
Leading to a higher still.

Thus from rank to rank ascending,
Mounts the Mason's path of love,
Bright its earthly course, and ending
In the glorious Lodge above.



SECTION FOURTH.

RAISING.



IV-1. LET US REMEMBER.

by Thomas Power.
Air See Manual of Masonic Music, p. 10.

Let us remember in our youth,
Before the evil days draw nigh,
Our Great Creator, and his Truth,
Ere memory fail, and pleasures fly;
Or sun, or moon, or planet's light
Grow dark, or clouds return in gloom;
Ere vital spark no more incite;
When strength shall bow and years consume.

Let us in youth remember Him!
Who formed our frame, and spirits gave,
Ere windows of the mind grow dim,
Or door of speech obstructed wave;
When voice of bird fresh terrors wake,
And music's daughters charm no more,
Or fear to rise with trembling shake,
Along the path we travel o'er.

In yonth, to God let memory cling,
Before desire shall fail or wane,
Or ever be loosed life's silver string,
Or bowl at fountain rent in twain;
For man to his long home doth go,
And mourners group around his urn!
Our dust to dust again must flow,
And spirits unto God return.

IV-2. SOLEMN STRIKES.

by David Vinton.
Air Manual of Masonic Musie, p. 13.

Solemn strikes the funeral chime,
Notes of our departing time;
As we journey here below,
Through a pilgrimage of woe.

Mortals now indulge a tear,
For Mortality is here;
See how wide her trophies wave,
O'er the slumbers of the grave.

Here another Guest we bring!
Seraphs of celestial wing,
To our funeral altar come,
Waft a Friend and Brother home.

Lord of all below, above,
Fill our souls with Truth and Love;
As dissolves our earthly tie,
Take us to thy Lodge on high.



SECTION FIFTH.

CLOSING.



V-1. ONE HOUR WITH YOU.

by Rob Morris.
Air "Auld Lang Syne."

One hour with you, one hour with you,
No doubt, nor care, nor strife,
Is worth a weary year of woe,
In all that lightens life.
Chorus

One hour with you, and you, and you,
Bright links in mystic chain
Oh may we oft these joys renew,
And often meet again.

Your eyes with love's own language free,
Your hand-grips, strong and true,
Your voice, your heart, do welcome me
To spend an hour with you.

I come when morning skies are bright,
To work my Mason's due
To labor is my chief delight,
And spend an hour with you.

I go when evening gilds the west
1 breathe the fond adieu,
But hope again, by fortune blest,
To spend an hour with you.

V-2. BROTHERS, ERE TO-NIGHT.

by G. W. Chase.
Air Chase's Masonic Harp, p.62.

Brothers, ere to-night we part,
Every voice and every heart,
Grateful souls to Heaven raise,
Hymning forth your songs of praise.

Brothers, we may meet no more;
Yet there is a happier shore,
Where, released from toil and pain,
Brothers, we shall meet again.

V-3. THE LEVEL AND THE SQUARE.

by Rob Morris.

We meet upon the Level and we part upon the Square,
What words of precious meaning those words Masonic are!
Come, let us contemplate them, they are worthy of a thought,
With the highest, and the lowest, and the rarest they are fraught.

We meet upon the Level, though from every station come;
The monarch from his palace, and the poor man from his home;
For the one must leave his diadem outside the Mason's door,
And the other finds his true respect upon the checkered floor.

We part upon the Square, for the world must have its due;
We mingle with the multitude, a cold, unfriendly crew,
But the influence of our gatherings in memory is green,
And we long upon the Level to renew the happy scene.


There's a world where all are equal we are hurrying toward it fast;
We shall meet upon the Level there, when the gates of death are past;
We shall stand before the Orient, and our Master will be there
To try the blocks we offer by his own unerring Square.

We shall meet upon the Level there, but never thence depart;
There's a Mansion 'tis all ready for each trusting, faithful heart
There's a Mansion and a welcome and a multitude is there
Who have met upon the Level, and been tried upon the Square.

Let us meet upon the Level then, while laboring patient here;
Let us meet and let us labor, though the labor be severe;
Already in the Western Sky the signs bid us prepare
To gather up our Working tools and part upon the Square.

Hands round ye faithful Masons, form the bright, fraternal chain,
We part upon the Square below, to meet in heaven again.
Oh what words of precious meaning those words Masonic are,
We meet upon the Level and we part upon the Square!

V-4. ADIEU! A HEART-WARM.

by Robert Burns.

Adieu! a heart-warm fond adieu,
Dear brothers of the Mystic Tie!
Ye favored, ye enlightened few,
Companions of my social joy!
Tho' I to foreign lands must hie,
Pursuing fortune's sliddry ba',
With melting heart, and brimful eye,
I'll mind you still, tho' far awa'.

Oft have I met your social band,
And spent the cheerful festive night;
Oft honored with supreme command,
Presided o'er the Sons of Light:
And by that Hieroglyphic bright,
Which none but Craftsmen ever saw!
Strong mem'ry on my heart shall write
Those happy scenes when far awa'.

May freedom, harmony and love,
Unite you in the Grand Design,
Beneath th' Omniscient Eye above,
The glorious Architect divine!
That you may keep th' Unerring Line,
Still rising by the Plummet's Law,
Till order bright completely shine,
Shall be my pray'r when far awa'.

And You, farewell! whose merits claim
Justly, that Highest Badge to wear!
Hcav'n bless your honor'd, noble name,
To Masonry and Scotia dear!
A last request permit me here,
When yearly ye assemble a',
One round, I ask it with a tear,
To him, the Bard that's far awa'.

V-5. AULD LANG SYNE.

by Robert Burns.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to min'?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days of Auld Lang Syne?
Chorus

For Auld Lang Syne, my dear,
For Auld Lang Syne;
We'll take a cup of kindness yet,
For Auld Lang Syne.

An' here is a hand, my trusty fier,
An' gie's a hand of thine;
An' we'll toom the stowp to friendship's growth,
And days of Auld Lang Syne.

An' surely ye'll be your pint stowp,
An' surely I'll be mine;
An' we'll take a right good willywaught,
For Auld Lang Syne.



SECTION SIXTH.

FUNERAL RITES.



VI-1. WREATHE THE MOURNING BADGE AROUND.

by Rob Morris.
Air "Pleyel's Hymn."

Wreathe the mourning badge around
Brothers hark! a funeral sound!
Where the parted had his home,
Meet and bear him to the tomb.

While they journey, weeping, slow
Silent, thoughtful let us go;
Silent life to him is sealed:
Thoughtful death to him's revealed.

How his life path has been trod,
Brothers, leave we unto God!
Friendship's mantle, love and faith,
Lend sweet fragrance e'en to death.

Here amidst the things that sleep,
Let him rest his grave is deep;
Death has triumphed; loving hands
Can not raise him from his bands.

But the emblems that we shower,
Tell us there's a mightier power,
O'er the strength of death and hell,
Judah's Lion shall prevail.

Dust to dust, the dark decree
Soul to God, the soul is free:
Leave him with the lowly lain
Brothers, we shall meet again.

VI-2. PRECIOUS IN THE SIGHT.

by Rob Morris.
Air "Mozart."

Precious in the sight of heaven
Is the place where Christians die;
Souls with all their sins forgiven,
To the courts of glory fly.
Every sorrow, every burden,
Every Cross they lay it down;
Jesus gives them richest guerdon
In his own immortal Crown.

Here, above our Brother weeping,
Through our tears we seize this hope
He in Jesus sweetly sleeping,
Shall awake in glory up!
He has borne his Cross in sorrow,
Weary pilgrim, all forlorn,
When the sun shines bright to-morrow,
'Twill reveal his sparkling Crown.

Knights of Christ, your ranks are broken!
Close your front! the foe is nigh!
Shield to Shield! behold the token
As he saw it in the sky!
By that Sign so bright, so glorious,
Ye shall conquer if ye strive,
And like him, though dead, victorious,
In the courts of Jesus live.

VI-3. UNVAIL THY BOSOM.

Air See Masonic Musical Manual, p.325.

Unvail thy bosom, faithful tomb;
Take this new treasure to thy trust,
And give these sacred relics room
To slumber in the silent dust.

Nor pain, nor grief, nor anxious fear,
Invade thy bounds; no mortal woes
Can reach the silent sleepers here,
While angels watch their soft repose.

Here, Brother, sleep, beneath the stone
Which tells a mortal here is laid,
Rest, here, till God shall from his throne,
The darkness break, and pierce the shade.

Break from his throne, illustrious morn!
Attend, 0 earth! God's sovereign word;
Restore thy trust a glorious form
He must ascend to meet his Lord.

VI-4. BEAR HIM HOME.

by Rob Morris.

Bear him home, his bed is made
In the stillness, in the shade
Day has parted, night has come,
Bear the Brother to his home.
Bear him home.

Bear him home, no more to roam
Bear the tired pilgrim home;
Forward! all his toils are o'er,
Home, where journeying is no more.
Bear him home.

Lay him down his bed is here
See, the dead are resting near;
Brothers they their Brothers own,
Lay the wanderer gently down.
Lay him down.

Lay him down; let nature spread
Starry curtains o'er the dead;
Lay him down; let angel eyes
View him kindly from the skies.
Lay him down.

Ah, not yet for us, the bed
Where the faithful pilgrim's laid;
Pilgrims weep! again to go
Through life's weariness and woe.
Ah, not yet!

Soon 'twill come, if faithful here,
Soon the end of all our care;
Strangers here, we seek a home,
Friends and Saviour, in the tomb.
Soon 'twill come!

Let us go, and on our way,
Faithful journey, faithful pray;
Through the sunshine, through the snow,
Boldly, Brother pilgrims go!
Let us go!

INDEX OF FIRST LINES

In Alphabetical Order

Section
and
Number
First LineAuthor
V-4. Adieu! a heart-warm fond adieu, Robert Burns
VI-4. Bear him home, his bed is made Rob Morris
II-1. Behold how pleasant and how good Giles P. Yates
V-2. Brothers, ere to-night we part, G. W. Chase
III-1. Brothers faithful and deserving Hercules Ellis
I-1. Come, Brothers of the Craft, unite, Thomas Power
IV-1. Let us remember in our youth, Thomas Power
V-1. One hour with you, one hour with you, Rob Morris
VI-2. Precious in the sight of heaven Rob Morris
V-5. Should auld acquaintance be forgot, Robert Burns
IV-2. Solemn strikes the funeral chime, David Vinton
VI-3. Unvail thy bosom, faithful tomb; -
V-3. We meet upon the Level and we part upon the Square,Rob Morris
I-2. Where hearts are warm with kindred fire,Rob Morris
I-3. Wherever man is tracing Rob Morris
II-2. While journeying on our darksome way, Thomas Power
VI-1. Wreathe the mourning badge around Rob Morris
I-4. Ye happy few who here extend -