Transcription Notes: This Internet file is not an exact copy of the book. Certain liberties have been taken. It is presented here as a collection of poetry, rather than as songs to be sung. Some of the conventions helpful for singing, such as breaking words into syllables and heavy use of apostrophes for elided 'e's and 'v's, were felt unnecessary and distracting, so many of the 'v's and practically all of the vowels that were apostrophized out have been replaced. While choruses are noted, repeating line have otherwise been left out. A very few spellings have been modernized, and typographic errors corrected.

While we have retained the listing of suggested tunes, we have left out such other musical information as key signatures and composers or arrangers, if they didn't write the lyrics. (Most arrangements were by the compiler, C.W. Mabie; in a few cases, it was unclear if the names with the songs were for music or words, so we left those in). The original had scores for most songs, which we have left out. If you are in need of them, a photocopy of the book is available at Google Books, http://books.google.com/books?id=VKhBUSr7rY4C&pg=PA7, with the page number you want as the digits at the tail of the URL (page 7, in this sample).

There are 121 poems in this volume, but several are duplications, and several others are not Masonic, so only included within this file, but not in the external indexes.

Page numbers ran from 7, for the title page, to 112, for the final page of indexes, with the song numbers serving as page numbers. This caused some anomalies, because the songs were not presented in numerical order! We guess the numbers correspond to the 1st edition of 1866, but this file was created from the 11th edition, of 1897. Because of this, it was found useful to add a Table of Contents. Originally, there was no Table of Contents, but several indexes at the back, of music, first lines, and subjects. These have not proved to be accurate, so the first line index (which we use here at M.P.S.) has been corrected, but the other two, although not corrected, are left in, as they are still useful for music and subject lists, and some of the numbers are correct. We have also added an author index, though most songs were uncredited.

This book did not include any artwork.

Table of Contents

In Order of Presentation

Duplicated numbers have had a, b, or c added in this HTML version only.
Titles entered in ALL-CAPS included music scores.

The Mystic Chord
1. ENTERED APPRENTICE.
2. Master Mason,
6. ENTERED APPRENTICE.
7a. ENTERED APPRENTICE.
5. Fellow Craft.
8. ENTERED APPRENTICE.
7b. Closing
9a. ENTERED APPRENTICE.
9b. Closing.
10. ENTERED APPRENTICE.
11a. Entered Apprentice.
11b. FELLOW CRAFT.
13a. Master Mason.
12. FELLOW CRAFT.
13b. FELLOW CRAFT.
16a. Opening.
14. FELLOW CRAFT.
18a. Closing.
15. MASTER MASON.
20a. Closing.
16b. MASTER MASON.
17. MASTER MASON.
23a. Master Mason.
18b. MASTER MASON.
25a. Opening.
19. MASTER MASON.
27a. Installation.
20b. MASTER MASON.
29a. Anniversary Ode.
Opening Pieces.
21. LORD WE COME BEFORE THEE NOW.
22. HOLY FATHER.
32a. Opening.
33a. Opening or Closing.
23b. HEAVENLY FATHER, GENTLY BLESS US.
24. MET AGAIN.
25b. HOW PLEASANT 'TIS TO SEE.
26. BRETHREN ALL WHEREVER YOU BE.
27b. NOW WHILE EVENING SHADES ARE FALLING.
28. AS MORNING BREEZE IN BALMY SPRING.
29b. OPENING HYMN.
40a. Closing.
30. HOW SWEET WHEN SHADES OF EVEN.
31. WHEN THE LIGHT OF DAY.
32b. COME BROTHERS OF THE PLUMB AND SQUARE.
33b. WHAT JOY WHEN BRETHREN DWELL COMBINED.
34. O GOD WE LIFT OUR HEARTS TO THEE.
Closing Pieces.
35. NOW WE PART!
45a. Closing
36. SOON WE PART.
47a. Closing
48a. Closing
37. OUR SOCIAL LABORS.
38. FAREWELL.
39. HOW SWEET WHEN SHADES.
40b. COME, BROTHERS ACCEPTED.
41. AS THE EVENING SHADES DESCENDING.
42. GOOD NIGHT.
45b. AN HOUR WITH YOU.
44. THE LEVEL AND THE SQUARE.
46. CLOSING HYMN.
47b. CLOSING.
48b. HEAVENLY PARENT!
58a. Closing.
59a. Closing.
49. WE HAVE MET IN PEACE.
50. BROTHERS, GOOD NIGHT.
51. FUNERAL SERVICE.
60a. Hymn for Installation.
52. BEAR HIM HOME.
53. DEATH OF A BROTHER.
63. Funeral.
54. CORNER STONE.
55. ANNIVERSARY ODE.
56. ANNIVERSARY ODE.
57. DEDICATION.
68a. Hymn for Consecration.
58b. DEDICATION.
59b. DEDICATION.
71a. Laying Foundation Stone.
60b. Opening Ode.
61. Installation Ode.
62. COME LET US JOIN IN CHEERFUL SONG.
64. A PLACE IN THE CIRCLE FOR ME.
65. MASONIC SONG.
66. THE LODGE.
67. OLD FRIENDS.
68b. OPENING OF THE LODGE.
72a. Entered Apprentice.
73a. Fellow Craft.
69. CLOSING OF THE LODGE.
74a. Fellow Craft.
75a. Master Mason.
70. GOD SPEED THE RIGHT.
71b. SONG FOR THE TWENTY-FOURTH OF JUNE.
72b. FRIENDS AND BROTHERS SWELL THE SONG.
73b. MEEK AND LOWLY.
74b. THE MASON'S HOME.
75b. GENTLY, LORD! OH! GENTLY LEAD US.
76. OPENING CHANT.
76a. Opening.
76b. Opening.
76c. Opening.
77. CHANT. No.2.
77a. Entered Apprentice.
77b. Entered Apprentice.
77c. Opening.
78a. CHANT. No.3.
78b. Entered Apprentice.
79. CHANT. No.4.
79a. Fellow Craft.
79b. Fellow Craft.
79c. Fellow Craft.
80. CHANT No.5.
80. Master Mason.
81. MASTER MASON. No.6.
Miscellaneous [non-Masonic] Music.
82-83. AUTUMN LEAVES.
84-88. LARBOARD WATCH.
89-93. OUR WAY ACROSS THE SEA.
94-96. LADY OF BEAUTY.
97-99. A LITTLE FARM WELL TILLED.
100-101. THE WANDERER'S FAREWELL.
102-103. SWEET EVENING HOURS.
103-104. LUTZOW'S WILD HUNT.
105. OH, SWEET WAS THE HOUR.
106-109. The Ceremony Observed At Funerals.
109. FUNERAL HYMN.
Indexes
110. Index to Subjects. [Not accurate!]
111. Index to Music. [Not accurate!]
Index of First Lines, in Alphabetical Order
Index of First Lines, in Presentation Order

The

Mystic Chord,

A Collection Of

Masonic Odes and Melodies

For The

CEREMONIES AND FESTIVALS

To Which Is Added A

CHOICE SELECTION OF MISCELLANEOUS MUSIC,

By

CHESTER W.MABIE.

Eleventh Edition.

MASONIC PUBLISHING & SUPPLY CO.

84 Park Row, N. Y.

1897.



Entered According to act of Congress, in the year 1866. by
CHESTER W. MABIE,
In the Clerk's office of the U. S. District Court for the District of New Jersey.


Entered according to an act of Congress, 1897. by MASONIC PUB. & SUPPLY CO..

REFERENCES.


We have carefully examined the MYSTIC CHORD, published by Bro. CHESTER W. MABIE, and take pleasure in recommending it to the favorable notice of the Craft, as a valuable addition to the various text books in use in Masonic bodies. We are pleased with the judgment, taste, and skill evinced in the arrangement of the various melodies contained in his book, and believe that it will supply a want that has long been felt, by members of the Fraternity, because the book has been prepared especially to accommodate mixed voices — in large assemblies. The melodies are flowing and graceful, are written within the compass of any voice, and are easily learned.

ROBERT D. HOLMES, Grand Master, State of New York.
JAMBS M. AUSTIN, Grand Secretary, State of New York.
ROYAL G. MILLARD, P.D.D.G.M., State of New York.
THEODORE R. VARICK, P.D.G.M., State of New Jersey.
JAMES S. GAMBLE, P.M., Varick Lodge 31, State of New Jersey.
GEORGE B. EDWARDS, P.M., Bergen Lodge 47, State of New Jersey.
WILLIAM H. BUDLONG, P.M., Sylvan Grove Lodge, 275, State of New York.
JOHN SHEVILLE, W.M., Eagle Lodge 53, State of New Jersey.
JOHN R. TERRY, W.M., Hoboken Lodge, 35, State of New Jersey.
WM. T. WOODRUFF, W.M., Manhattan Lodge 62, State of New York.
WM. H. WALTER, Organist, New York.
JOSIAH N. KING, Organist, New York.
RALPH CLARK, Organist, New York.
THOMAS K. ALFORD, Organist, New York.
ELIAS P. ST.JOHN, Organist, New York.
A. G. CANN, Organist, Newark, New Jersey.

PREFACE.


Contemplating the general associations of man, it is remarkable how few of their gatherings are brought to a successful issue without the accompaniment of Music; on almost all the occasions that invite him from the busy world of Art, Commerce or Industry, or from the home of his family to join in other than the most ordinary of his pursuits. Music forms a part, at least, and in many instances a principal feature of his social enjoyments; there is nothing that arouses the passions, elevates the soul, and exalts man, stimulating him to greater moral attainments than this force — Music — the science of harmonious sounds appealing alike to the better nature of humanity whereever it be, the magnificent echoes of the thunder of the Great Architect rolling through space, or the plaintive air, for aid from those dependent, the power of Music over the mind for good has never been defined, for it is of itself immeasurable ; divested of it, a Nation or a Church, have nothing but the very nakedness of a people, or crude religion, without beauty or grace. Masoury whose ideal empire is founded on the good of man to his fellow, cannot hide the formality of its ritual but by bringing to its aid this poetic outpouring of the soul.

In presenting the MYSTIC CHORD to the fraternity, the Author feels that it is no novolty, no innovation, but a time honored custom in most if not all Lodges having facilities, and from a close observation of the wants, has taken pains to cull from many flowers those only having fragrance and adaptability to the special use intended. As a creative of that moral which all admit is so essential a feature in our rites and ceremonies the memory of which still rings in the ears of those devotees who proudly rejoice in the name of Mason, to the craft, this work is humbly dedicated, in the faith that it will meet the wants of many, and be received in a fraternal spirit by all who believe that the strength and support of the Masonic Institution is Peace and Harmony.


The favor with which the MYSTIC CHORD has been received, and the recognition by the Craft of its general adaptability to the use of Lodges has emboldened the author to issue the second edition; in presenting which it is confidently hoped that the same generous patronage awarded to the work, will be merited, and extended to the present carefully revised and enlarged edition.


The Mystic Chord



1. ENTERED APPRENTICE.

Music: Dundee. C.M. (Pg. 20, Concordia.)

Spirit of power and might! behold,
Thy willing servant here;
With thy protection him infold.
And free his heart from fear.
Tho' darksome skies may o'er him lower,
And dangers fill the way:
Support him with thy gracions power,
And be his constant stay.

2. Master Mason,

Music: as above

Teach me the measure of my days,
Thou maker of my frame;
I would survey life's narrow space,
And learn how frail I am.

A span is all that we can boast,
How short the fleeting time!
Man is but vanity and dust,
In all his flower and prime.

6. ENTERED APPRENTICE.

Music: Auld Lang Syne.

O, welcome brother to our band,
Though strong its numbers now,
And high its lofty pillars stand,
And noble arches bow.
Chorus

O, welcome, if thy heart be true,
Thou'lt find with us a home,
We're daily adding columns new,
Unto our glorious dome.

Now let our ardent prayers arise,
For blessings on his brow,
And bear our offering to the skies,
For him who joins us now,

7a. ENTERED APPRENTICE.

Music: Tappan. (Pg. 18, Concordia.)
G.Kingsley.

Almighty Father! God of love —
Behold thy servant here,
O may he trust in thee above,
Free thou his heart from fear.

Though darksome skies shall o'er him lower,
And dangers fill the way,
Support him with thy gracious power,
And be his constant stay.

5. Fellow Craft.

Music: as above

O, welcome, brother, to our band,
Though strong its numbers now,
And high its lofty pillars stand,
And noble arches bow.

O, welcome if thy heart be true,
Thou'lt find with us a home;
We're daily adding columns new
Unto our glorious dome.

Now let our heartfelt prayers arise,
For blessings on his brow,
And bear our offerings to the skies,
For him who joins us now.

8. ENTERED APPRENTICE.

Music: Arlington. C.M. (Pg. 19, Concordia.)

Behold how pleasant and how good,
For brethren such as we;
Of the accepted brotherhood,
To dwell in unity.

'Tis like the oil on Aaron's head,
Which to his feet distils,
Like Hermon's dew so richly shed
On Zion's sacred hills.

For there the Lord of Light and Love
A blessing sent with power;
Oh! may we all this blessing prove,
Even life forevermore.

On Friendship's altar rising here,
Our hands now plighted be —
To live in love with hearts sincere,
In peace and unity.

7b. Closing

Music: as above (Pg. 8, Concordia.)

Now we must close our labors here,
Though sad it is to part;
May Love, Relief, and Truth sincere,
Unite each brother's heart.

Now to our homes let's haste away,
Still filled with love and light;
And may each heart, in kindness say.
Good night, brother, good night.

9a. ENTERED APPRENTICE.

Music: Hartshorn. L.M. (Pg. 19, Concordia.)

Far from the world's cold strife and pride,
Come join our peaceful happy band,
Come stranger, we your feet will guide,
Where truth and love shall hold command.

Although in untried paths you tread,
And filled perhaps with anxious fear,
A Brother's faithful hand shall lead,
Where doubt and darkness disappear.

Here may you in our labors join,
And prove yourself a brother true,
All sordid selfish cares resign,
And keep our sacred truths in view.

9b. Closing.

Music: as above

As from this place we go once more,
Thy blessing, Father, we implore;
Still may we keep the heavenly way,
And try to serve thee day by day.

And till again we gather here,
Help us to labor in thy fear;
Thy Truth impart, thy love distil,
That we may know and do thy will.

10. ENTERED APPRENTICE.

Music: Uxbridge. L.M. (Pg. 18, Concordia.)

Supreme Grand Master! God of power,
Be with us in this solemn hour;
Smile on our work, our plans approve,
Fill every heart with hope and love.

Let each discordant thought be gone,
And love unite onr hearts in one.
May we in union strong combine,
In work and worship so divine

11a. Entered Apprentice.

Music: as above (Pg. 20, Concordia.)

While journeying on our homeward way,
By love fraternal gently led,
Supreme Conductor ! Thee we pray
To smooth the dangerous path we tread.

No fear shall cross the trusting heart,
Our faith reposed on him above;
No dearer joy can life impart
Than gently breathes in words of love.

When earthly ties shall fade and die,
When earthly joys shall come no more,
Supreme Conductor! then supply
Thy holy aid, when time is o'er.

11b. FELLOW CRAFT.

Music: Balerma. C.M. (Pg. 21, Concordia.)

May our united hearts expand,
With love's refreshing showers;
Whose warm and kindling glow is feit,
To cheer our saddest hours.

Before our treasured shrine we bow,
In gratitude sublime,
Imploring still God's saving grace,
Through all of coming time.

13a. Master Mason.

Music: as above (Pg. 24, Concordia.)

Few are thy days and full of woe,
Oh, man, of woman born!
Thy doom is written, "Dust thou art,
And shalt to dust return."

Determined are the days that fly,
Snccessive o'er thy head;
The numbered hour is on the wing,
Which lays thee with the dead.

12. FELLOW CRAFT.

Music: Anderson. 11s. (Pg. 22, Concordia.)

Come, Craftsmen, assembled our pleasure to share,
Who walk by the plumb and who work by the square,
While travelling in love on the level of time,
Sweet hope shall light on to a far better clime.

We'll seek in our labors the spirit divine,
Our temple to bless and our hearts to refine,
And thus to our altar a tribute we'll bring,
While joined ih true friendship our anthem we sing.

See, Order and Beauty rise gently to view,
Each brother a column so perfect and true,
When Order shall cease, and when temples decay,
May each, fairer columns immortal survey.

13b. FELLOW CRAFT.

Music: Sicilian Hymn. (Pg. 22, Concordia.)

Brothers faithful and deserving,
Now the second rank you fill,
Purchased by your faultless serving,
Leading to a higher still.

Thus from rank to rank ascending,
Mounts the Mason's path of love,
Bright its earthly course and ending,
In the glorious Lodge above.

16a. Opening.

Music: as above

Heavenly Father, deign to bless us,
Lead our every thought above,
Let no earthly care oppress us,
May we all be fill'd with love.

Let no jarring thought divide us,
Sweetest harmony be ours:
Wisdom's richest feast provide us,
As we pass these happy hours.

14. FELLOW CRAFT.

Music: New York. L.M. (Pg. 23, Concordia.)

Thus far the Lord has led me on,
Thus far his power prolongs my days,
And every evening shall make known,
Some fresh memorial of his grace.

Oh! may his love with sweet control,
Bind every passion of my soul,
Bid erery vain desire depart,
And dwell forever in my heart.

18a. Closing.

Music: as above

Come, brothers, ere tonight we part,
Join every voice and every heart;
One solemn hymn to God we'll raise,
One closing song of grateful praise.

Here, brothers, we may meet no more.
But there is yet a happier shore;
And there, released from toil and pain
Dear brothers, we shall meet again.

15. MASTER MASON.

Music: Hamilton. 7s. (Pg. 24, Concordia.)

Hear my prayer! Jehovah hear!
Listen to my humble cries;
See the day of trouble near,
Heavy on my soul it lies.

Hide not then thy gracious face,
When the storm around me falls;
Hear me, O thou God of grace,
In the time thy servant calls.

20a. Closing.

Music: as above

Heavenly Parent! ere we part,
Send thy blessing to each heart;
Make us loving, true, and kind;
Make us one in heart and mind.

May we for each other care;
Each his Brother's burden bear:
Fill our souls with love divine;
Keep us, Lord, forever thine.

16b. MASTER MASON.

Music: Bonnie Doon. (Pg. 25, Concordia.)

Let us remember in our youth,
Before the evil days draw nigh;
Our Great Creator and his Truth,
Ere memory fail and pleasure fly,
Or sun, or moon, or planets light,
Grow dark or clouds return in gloom;
Ere vital spark no more incite,
When strength shall bow and years consume.

Let us in youth remember him,
Who formed our frame, and spirits gave,
Ere windows of the mind grow dim,
Or door of speech obstructed wave;
When voice of bird fresh terrors wake,
And music's daughters charm no more,
Or fear to rise with trembling shake,
Along the path we travel o'er.

In youth to God let memory cling,
Before desire shall fail or wane;
Or e'er be loosed life's silver string,
Or bowl at fountain rent in twain;
For man to his long home doth go,
And mourners group around his urn;
Our dust to dust again must flow,
And spirits unto God return.

17. MASTER MASON.

Music: Alida. C.M. (Pg. 26, Concordia.)

The Lord unto thy prayer attend,
In troubles darksome hour;
The name of Jacob's God defend,
And shield thee by his power.

Should friends and kindred, near and dear,
Leave thee to want and die;
May heaven make thy life its care,
And all thy need supply.

23a. Master Mason.

Music: as above

Almighty Father! gracious Lord!
Kind Guardian of our days!
Thy mercies let our hearts record,
In songs of grateful praise.

Lord, when this mortal frame decays,
And every weakness dies,
Complete the wonders of thy grace,
And raise as to the skies.

18b. MASTER MASON.

Music: Welton. L.M. (Pg. 3, Concordia.)

Great God! wilt thou meet with us here,
And bless us in our works of love;
Thy sacred name we all revere,
Oh! grant us blessings from above.

May each be found a living stone,
For heavenly mansions, tried and squared;
When all our earthly sands are run,
The scythe of time find us prepared.

By the strong grip of Judah's king,
May we be raised to realms of peace;
There constant songs of praises sing,
In that Grand Lodge of endless bliss.

25a. Opening.

Music: as above

Great God, behold before thy throne,
A band of brothers lowly bend :
Thy sacred Name we humbly own,
And pray that thou wilt be our friend.

A band of brothers may we live,
A band of brothers may we die;
To each may God, our Father, give
A home of peace above the sky.

19. MASTER MASON.

Music: Hebron. L.M. (Pg. 26, Concordia.)

Dangers of every form attend
Your steps as onward you proceed,
No earthly power can now befriend
Or aid you in this time of need.

Confide your trust in him alone
Who rules all things above, below;
Send your petitions to his throne,
For he alone can help you now.

27a. Installation.

Music: as above (Pg. 27, Concordia.)

Let Masons ever live in love;
Lot harmony their blessings prove;
And be the sacred Lodge — the place,
Where freedom smiles in every face.

Behold the world all in amaze,
Each curious eye with transport gaze;
They look, they like, they wish to be,
What none can gain, except he's free.

Let Masons then, with watchful eye,
Regard the works of Charity;
Let Union, Love, and Friendship meet,
And show that Wisdom's ways are sweet.

20b. MASTER MASON.

Music: Hamburg. L.M. (Pg. 26, Concordia)

Death like an ever flowing stream,
Sweeps us away — our life's a dream.
An empty tale — a morning flower —
Cut down and withered in an hour.

Teach us, O Lord, how frail is man,
And kindly lengthen out our span.
Till cleansed by grace, we all may be
Prepared to die and dwell with thee.

29a. Anniversary Ode.

Music: as above (Pg. 31, Concordia)

Hail! Masonry, thou craft divine!
Come, brethren, let us cheerful join,
To celebrate this happy day,
And homage to our Master pay.

Next sing, my muse, our Warden's praise,
With chorus loud, in tuneful lays;
Oh! may these columns never decay,
Until the world dissolves away.

Come, Brethren, cheerful join with me
To sing the praise of Masonry;
The noble, faithful, and the brave,
Whose Art shall live beyond the grave.

OPENING PIECES.



21. LORD WE COME BEFORE THEE NOW.

Music: Newark. 7s. (Pg. 7, Concordia)

Lord we come before thee now,
At thy feet we humbly bow,
Fill our hearts with thy rich grace,
Tune our lips to sing thy praise.

Comfort those who weep and mourn,
Let the time of joy return,
Those who are cast down, lift up,
Make them strong in Faith and Hope.

Grant that all may seek and find
Thee a God supremely kind,
Heal the sick, the captive free,
Let us all rejoice in thee.

22. HOLY FATHER.

Music: Wood. 7s. (Pg. 5, Concordia.)

Holy Lord, lend now thine ear,
While our grateful song we raise;
May devotion, pure, sincere,
Mingle with our notes of praise.

Help us at this sacred hour,
Send the cares of earth away;
May we feel thy Spirit's power,
While we chant our solemn lay.

Fill our hearts with holy fear,
While we feel thy presence nigh;
Let contrition's gentle tear,
Moisten every Brother's eye.

32a. Opening.

Music: as above

Softly now the light of day
Fades upon our sight away;
Free from care, from labor free,
Lord, we would commune with thee.

Soon for us the light of day
Shall forever pass away;
Then from care and sorrow free,
Take us, Lord, to dwell with thee.

33a. Opening or Closing.

Music: as above

Holy Spirit, from on high,
Bend over us a pitying eye;
Life and peace to us impart;
Dwell thyself in every heart.

May we constant grow in grace,
And with vigor run the race,
Trained in wisdom, led by love,
Till we reach our rest above.

23b. HEAVENLY FATHER, GENTLY BLESS US.

Music: Mant. (Pg. 3, Concordia.)

Heavenly Father, gently bless us,
Lead our every thought above.
Let no earthly care oppress us,
May we all be filled with love,
Let no jarring thought divide us,
Sweetest harmony be ours,
Wisdom's richest feast provide us,
As we pass these happy hours.

Father! hear the prayer we offer,
For repose we do not cry,
But for grace that we may ever,
Live our lives courageously,
Be our strength in every weakness,
In our doubt be thou our guide,
Through each peril, through each danger,
Draw us nearer to thy side.

24. MET AGAIN.

Music: Home Again. (Pg. 4, Concordia.)
Words by G.W. Chase.

Met again, met again, in this loved retreat;
And oh! it fills our souls with joy.
Our brothers here to greet;
Here friendship beams from every eye,
And smiles on every face;
There's naught on earth can break the tie
That binds us to this place.

Trusting hearts, trusting hearts, here each other greet;
And oh! beside our happy home,
There's not a place so sweet;
The pride of wealth, the pride of birth,
We keep without our door;
Receive the humblest son of earth,
If true, we ask no more.

Friendship sweet, friendship sweet, lingers round the place;
And on each heart 'tis graved in lines,
That time cannot efface;
We meet in peace, we work in love,
And part upon the square;
And unto him who rules above,
Lift up our voice in prayer.

25b. HOW PLEASANT 'TIS TO SEE.

Music: Silver Stream. 3.P.M.
Words by C.W. MABIE.

How pleasant 'tis to see
Kindred and friends agree
Each in his proper station move;
And each fulfil his part,
With sympathizing heart,
In all the cares of life and love!

Like fruitful showers of rain,
That water all the plain,
Descending from the neighboring hills;
Such streams of pleasure roll
Through every friendly soul,
Where love, like heavenly dew distils.

'Tis like the ointment shed
On Aaron's sacred head,
Divinely rich, divinely sweet!
The oil through all the room
Diffused a choice perfume,
Ran through his robes, and blest his feet.

26. BRETHREN ALL WHEREVER YOU BE.

Music: Condit.

Brethren all, wherever you be,
Sons of Light, ye Masons Free,
Honor Truth and Virtue be,
Pride of Masonry,
Fervent zeal, with heart and hand,
Love cemented, mystic band,
Firm, undaunted make us stand,
Glorious Masonry.

Masons all from pole to pole,
Love may guide, and truth control,
Sorrows come — what can condole
Griefs like Masonry,
Kindly smiling we have met,
Welcome each, and never forget,
Absent ones whom we regret,
Friends in Masonry.

Craftsmen all may love impart
Warmth into each honest heart,
Oft consult that faithful chart,
Guide of Masonry,
When the spirit hence hath fled,
Angel-guards their pinions spread,
Joyful crown each Mason's head,
Heavenly Masoury.

27b. NOW WHILE EVENING SHADES ARE FALLING.

Music: Woodruff. 5s. & 7s
Words by G.W. Chase.

Now while evening shades are falling.
Softly over land and sea,
While to work the gavel's calling,
Gently calling you and me,
Here we meet in chain unbroken,
Here we meet in friendship bright.
Kindly word and friendly token.
Waiting here each son of light.

Here in peace we meet together,
Face to face and heart to heart,
Nought on earth can us dissever,
In love we meet, in love we part,
Loving spirits hover o'er us,
Sweetest harmony is ours.
Brightly shines the light before us,
As we pass these happy hours.

28. AS MORNING BREEZE IN BALMY SPRING.

Music: Allendale. C.M. (Pg. 6, Concordia)
Words by G.W. Chase.

As morning breeze in balmy spring,
Or summer's gentle shower;
As joyous notes the May birds bring,
Or perfume of wild flower;
So sweet to me the quiet eve,
I met with such as you,
And round the altar vow to cleave
To every brother true.

'Tis there we feel the joys that rise
In each true Mason's heart;
As in the scenes of life he tries
To act a brother's part;
'Tis there the heart may speak its joy,
Its trouble and its fear;
No cowan near, that can annoy,
No dull unfriendly ear.

There Faith, and Hope, and Charity,
In brightest colors shine;
While Truth, and Love, and Unity,
Proclaim our Art divine;
There Friendship smiles on every face,
For such as you and me;
Oh! may I ever find a place
Among the Accepted free.

29b. OPENING HYMN.

Music: America (Pg. 5, Concordia)

Glad hearts to thee we bring,
With joy thy name we sing,
Father above.
Creation praises thee,
Thy bounty's full and free,
In all around we see,
Emblems of love.

Unite our souls in love,
Smile on us from above,
Till life is o'er.
Then gather us to thee,
Thy kingdom, Lord, to see,
In thine own fold to be
Forevermore

40a. Closing.

Music: as above

Spirit of truth and love,
Descending from above,
Our hearts inflame;
Till Masonry's control,
Shall build in one the whole,
A Temple of the soul
To thy great Name.

When our last labor's o'er,
And scenes of life no more
Charm our frail sight;
Then in God's holy care,
May each protection share,
Bliss find unending there.
In perfect light.

30. HOW SWEET WHEN SHADES OF EVEN.

Words by G.W. Chase.

How sweet when shades of even
Steal over the hill and plain;
When the moon lights up the heaven;
To meet in peace again;
To meet in peace again,
Among the Accepted free:
Oh, the happiness, dear brother,
To meet with such as thee.

We meet upon the level,
Whatever the name we bear;
And when complete our labor,
We part upon the square,
We part upon the square,
Like brothers true and free:
Oh, the happiness, dear brother,
To meet with such as thee.

Here Love, like sun of summer,
Imparts both light and heat;
There's not, wherever we wander,
Another place so sweet,
Another place so sweet,
Nor hearts so true and free:
Oh, the happiness, dear brother,
To meet with such us thee.

31. WHEN THE LIGHT OF DAY.

Music: Waterman. 5s. & 7s.

When the light of day is winging,
To this place we oft repair:
Here we all unite in singing,
Here devoutly join in prayer!
While in harmony our voices,
Are ascending to our God,
Every grateful heart rejoices,
Thus to spread his praise abroad.

In the duties now before us,
Let us faithfully engage;
May the light of truth shine o'er us.
Brightly from the sacred page:
Father! thus in pure devotion,
Every thought inspired by love,
Gratitude in each emotion.
Would we lift our souls above.

32b. COME BROTHERS OF THE PLUMB AND SQUARE.

Words by G.W. Chase.

Come, Brothers of the plumb and square,
Come, join in cheerful song;
Let every heart and voice prepare
The glad notes to prolong,
We're Brothers, by a mystic tie,
We're Brothers true and free.
Then let the song ascend on high —
God speed Freemasonry.

In love we meet, in peace we part;
We walk by plummet's line;
While Friendship dwells within each heart
That owns the craft divine,
'Mid all the toils and cares of earth,
We steady keep our way;
With Faith, and Hope, we wait the birth
Of an Eternal day.

33b. WHAT JOY WHEN BRETHREN DWELL COMBINED.

Music: Rockwell.

What joy when Brethren dwell combined,
Inspiring unity of mind,
'Tis like the sacred unction shed,
On Aaron's venerable head;
When bathed in fragrance, doth respire
His reverend beard and rich attire.

Like dews which trickling down the sky,
In pearly drops on Hermon lie,
Or balmy vapors which distills,
On Zion's consecrated hills,
For there the Lord his blessing placed,
And these with life eternal graced.

34. O GOD WE LIFT OUR HEARTS TO THEE.

Music: Rose of Allendale. (Pg. 7, Concordia.)

O God we lift our hearts to thee,
And grateful voices raise,
We thank thee for this festire night,
Accept our humble praise,
Here may our souls delight to bless,
The God of truth aud grace;
Who crowns our labors with success,
Among the rising race.

May each unholy passion cease,
Each evil thought be crushed,
Each anxious care that mars our peace,
In faith and love be hushed,
Oh! may we all in love abound,
And Charity pursue;
Thus shall we be with glory crowned,
And love as angels do.

CLOSING PIECES.



35. NOW WE PART!

Music: Walnut Grove. 5s & 7s.

Now we part! what sad emotion
Fills each Brother's kindly heart;
As amid the world's commotion,
Each retires to take a part.

Let us round this sacred altar,
All our solemn vows renew;
Never waver, never falter,
Each be steadfast, firm, and true.

45a. Closing

Music: as above

Lo! the day of rest declineth,
Gather fast the shades of night;
Yet the sun that ever shineth,
Fills our souls with heavenly light.

While thine ear of love addressing,
Thus our parting hymn we sing,
Father, with thine evening blessing,
Rest we safe beneath thy wing.

36. SOON WE PART.

Music: Marshall. 5s. & 7s. (Pg. 10, Concordia)

Soon we part, let kind affection
Be in all our acts displayed;
Show by word, and deed, and action.
Truth, and love, and friendly aid.

Soon will our Grand Master call as
From his present bond of love;
And, if worthy, will install us
In the Great Grand Lodge above.

Let us then, in bonds fraternal,
Ever, ever onward move;
Let our ties be the eternal
Chain of Brotherhood and Love.

47a. Closing

Music: as above

Lo! the day at last declineth,
Gather fast the shades of night;
Yet the sun that ever shineth
Fills our souls with heavenly light.

While thine ear of love addressing,
Thus our parting hymn we sing.
Father, with thine evening blessing,
Rest we safe beneath thy wing.

48a. Closing

Music: as above

Part in peace! with deep thanksgiving,
Rendering as we homeward tread,
Gracious service to the living,
Tranquil memory to the dead.

Part in peace! such are the praises
God, our Maker, loveth best;
Such the worship that upraises
Human hearts to heavenly rest.

37. OUR SOCIAL LABORS.

Our social labors now we close,
And homeward quiet wend our way;
While every bosom warmly glows,
As sing we now our parting lay;
Good night, good night.
We part in peace and on the square,
And this shall be our parting prayer,
May heaven bless each Brother dear.

In works of charity and love,
May each one act a brother's part;
Till all shall meet in Lodge above,
And never more be called to part;
Farewell! farewell!
Until we meet on that bright shore,
In mansions blest, our labor o'er,
In mansions blest, our labor o'er.

38. FAREWELL.

Music: Home, Sweet Home. (Pg. 15, Concordia)
Words by G.W. Chase.

Farewell, till again, we shall welcome the time
Which brings us once more to our fame cherished shrine,
And though from each other we distant may roam;
Again may all meet in this our dear loved home.
Home, home, sweet, sweet home;
May every dear brother find joy and peace at home.

And when our last parting on earth shall draw nigh,
And we shall be called to the Grand Lodge on high;
May each be prepared when the summons shall come
To meet our Grand Master in heaven our home.
Home, home, sweet, sweet home;
May every dear brother in Heaven find a home.

39. HOW SWEET WHEN SHADES.

Music: My Mother Dear. (Pg. 9, Concordia)
Words by G.W. Chase.

How sweet when shades of evening
Steal o'er the land and sea;
To meet upon the level here,
Among the accepted free,
Where kindly words and warm embrace
Await each faithful heart;
Oh, earth can boast no happier place,
And no sublimer art;
We're Brothers here,
And this our prayer,
Heaven bless each Mason Brother.

From all the world's commotion,
Its troubles and its care,
Here, come to pass a quiet hour,
We Brothers of the square;
Here eye to eye, and heart to heart,
We join in mystic rite;
And when upon the square we part,
'Tis with a kind Good Night;
We're Brothers dear,
And this our prayer,
Heaven bless each Mason Brother.

40b. COME, BROTHERS ACCEPTED.

Music: Manhattan. 11s. (Pg. 12, Concordia)
Words by G.W. Chase.

Come, Brothers Accepted, come join in our song;
In soft swelling measure the glad notes prolong;
Our labor is over, the summons has come,
To lay by the trowel, and hie to our home,
Home, home, sweet, sweet home;
We lay by the trowel, and hie to our home.

In Friendship we meet, and in Friendship we part,
United in purpose, united in heart;
O thus be it ever, where'er we may roam,
Till we meet, ne'er to sever, in heaven our home.
Home, home, sweet, sweet home;
Till we meet, ne'er to sever, in heaven our home.

41. AS THE EVENING SHADES DESCENDING.

Music: Evening. (Pg. 10, Concordia)
Words by G.W. Chase.

As the evening shades descending,
Earth and sky together blending,
Brothers true their way are wending,
To their quiet, loved retreat,
Pleasant smile and friendly token
Greeting warm and kind word spoken
Wait them here in chain unbroken,
Wait them e'er when brothers meet.

Now around the altar bending,
While all thoughts are upward tending,
Every heart to heaven is sending,
Fervent prayers and grateful praise,
Trusting Faith each bosom filling
Hope like Hermon's dew distilling,
Love, each evil passion stilling.
Thus may ever pass our days.

Brightly shine the stars above us,
Warmly beat the hearts that love us,
Firm we stand, a band of brothers,
Linked in Love and Unity,
Wealth nor honors here encumber
And when strikes the mystic number,
Home we go to peaceful slumber,
Singing "Peace and Harmony."

42. GOOD NIGHT.

Good night, good night, and peace be with you,
Peace, that gentlest, parting strain;
Soft it falls, like dew on blossoms,
Cherishing within our bosoms,
Kind desires to meet again,
Kind desires to meet again,
Good night, Good night.

Good night, good night, but not forever,
Hope can see the morning rise;
Many a pleasant scene before us,
As if angels hovered over us,
Bearing blessings from the skies,
Bearing blessings from the skies,
Good night, Good night.

Good night, good night, O softly breathe it,
'Tis a prayer for those we love:
Peace to night, and joy to morrow;
For our God, who shields the sparrow,
Hears us in his courts above,
Hears us in His courts above,
Good night, Good night.

45b. AN HOUR WITH YOU.

Music: Gamble. C.M. (Pg. 11, Concordia)
Words by Bro. Rob. Morris.

An hour with you, an hour with you,
No care, or doubt, or strife.
Is worth a weary year of woe,
In all that sweetens life.
Chorus

One hour with you, and you and you,
Bright links in mystic chain,
Oh, may we oft these joys renew,
And often meet again.

Your eyes with love's own language free.
Your hand grips strong and true,
Your tongues, your hearts, do welcome me,
To spend an hour with you.

I come when Eastern skies are bright,
To work my Mason's due,
To labor is my chief delight,
And spend an hour with you.

I go when evening gilds the West,
I breathe the fond adieu,
And hope again, by fortune blest.
To spend an hour with you.

44. THE LEVEL AND THE SQUARE.

(Pg. 15, Concordia)
Written by Bro. Rob Morris

We meet upon the Level and we part upon the Square.
What words of precious meaning those words Masonic are!
Come, let us contemplate them, they are worthy of our thought,
With the highest and the lowest, and the rarest they are fraught.

We meet upon the Level, though from every station come,
The king from his palace, and the poor man from his home;
For the one must leave his diadem outside the Mason's door,
And the other finds his true respect upon the checkered floor.

We part upon the Square, for the world must have its due,
We mingle with the multitude, a cold, unfriendly crew;
But the influence of our gatherings in memory is green,
And we long upon the level to renew the happy scene.

There's a world where all are equal; we are hurrying to it fast,
We shall meet upon the Level there, when the gates of death are past;
We shall stand before the Orient and our Master will be there,
To try the blocks we offer by his own unerring square.

We shall meet upon the Level there, but never thence depart;
There's a Mansion — 'tis all ready for each trusting, faithful heart;
There's a mansion, and a welcome, and a multitude is there,
Who have met upon the level and been tried upon the square.

Let us meet upon the Level, then while laboring patient here;
Let us meet and let us labor though the labor be severe;
Already in the western sky the signs bid us prepare,
To gather up our working tools and part upon the Square.

Hands round, ye faithful Masons, form the bright fraternal chain.
We part upon the Square below to meet in Heaven again.
Oh! What words of precious meaning, those words Masonic are,
We meet upon the level and we part upon the square.

46. CLOSING HYMN.

Music: Scots Wha Hae (Pg. 13, Concordia)
Words by G.W. Chase.

Friends the parting hour has come,
Each must hie him to his home,
Ere we go before the throne,
Let as humbly kneel;
Humbly ask the God of grace,
To send down upon the place,
Blessings meet for every case,
Every brother's weal.

On the level did we meet,
Passed the hour in friendship sweet,
Happy here again to greet
Each Accepted one;
Ere we part, join hand in hand,
Firmly woven thus our band,
May each brother faithful stand,
Till life's labor's done.

Part we, now upon the square,
Trusting in our father's care;
May each craftsmans daily prayer,
Reach the Master's throne;
Till we meet in endless day,
So may each direct his way,
He shall hear his Father say,
Faithful servant come.

47b. CLOSING.

Music: Case 5s. & 7s.

Now our festive joys are ending,
And we all again most part;
Ere we go our voices blending,
Give the tribute of the heart;
Offer thanks with grateful feeling.
For our father's love and grace,
For the truths like plants of healing.
For the wounds of all our race,

Let us each the lessons heeding,
Of this holy festal time;
Strive by earnest prayer and reading,
To possess the truth sublime;
Truth that kindles like the shining
Of the stars when eve sets in,
Truth far better for divining,
Than the rods and charts of men.

Now farewell! but ere retreating,
Let us here in union strong;
Vow we will not live defeating,
All that prompts to turn from wrong;
Then at last on high ascending,
Shall our anthems joyous rise,
With angelic voices blending,
Far above yon azure skies.

48b. HEAVENLY PARENT!

Music: Nashville. 7s.
S. B. Ball.

Heavenly Parent! ere we part,
Send thy blessing to each heart;
Make as loving, true, and kind;
Make us one in heart and mind.

May we for each other care;
Each his Brother's burden bear,
Fill our souls with Love divine;
Keep us, Lord, forever thine.

58a. Closing.

Music: as above

Softly now the light of day
Fades upon our sight away;
Free from care, from labor free,
Lord, we would commune with thee.

Soon for us the light of day
Shall forever pass away;
Then, from care and sorrow free,
Take us, Lord, to dwell witb tbee.

59a. Closing.

Music: as above

Brothers, ere tonight we part,
Join each voice and every heart;
Grateful songs to God we'll raise,
Hymning forth our songs of praise.

Brothers, we may meet no more,
Yet there is a happier shore;
Where released from toil and pain,
Brothers we shall meet again.

49. WE HAVE MET IN PEACE.

Music: Sheville.
C.W. MABIE.

We have met in peace together,
In this loved retreat again;
Our constant friends have led us hither,
Here to join in tuneful strain.

We have met, and time is flying,
We shall part, and his swift wing,
Still sweeping over the dead and dying,
Will the changeful seasons bring.

Let us, while our hearts are lightest,
Look to Him who makes our years;
Rely on Him whose smile is brightest,
And whose grace will calm our fears.

He will aid us, should existance
With its sorrows sting the breast;
While gleaming in the onward distance
Faith will mark the land of rest.

50. BROTHERS, GOOD NIGHT.

Music: Nearer, My God to Thee. (Pg. 14, Concordia)
Dr. L. Mason.

Brothers, we meet again,
Too soon to part;
May Friendship bless his hour.
And warm each heart;
Tones that we love to hear,
Shall dwell upon the ear,
As we in accents clear,
Repeat, Good Night.

Brothers, once more farewell!
'Time bids us part;
Fond memory long shall dwell
Around each heart;
May Heaven its blessings send,
And peace our paths attend;
Until we meet again,
Farewell, Good Night.

51. FUNERAL SERVICE.

Music: Pleyel's Hymn. (same as 109)

Solemn strikes the funeral chime,
Notes of our departing time,
As we journey here below,
Through a pilgrimage of woe.

Mortals now indulge a tear,
For mortality is here,
See how wide her trophies wave,
Over the slumbers of the grave.

Here another guest we bring,
Seraphs of celestial wing,
To our funeral altar come,
Waft our friend and brother home.

Lord of all below, above,
Fill our souls with Truth and Love,
As dissolves our earthly tie.
Take us to thy Lodge on high.

60a. Hymn for Installation.

Music: as above (Pg. 28, Concordia.)

Unto thee, Great God, belong
Mystic rites, and sacred song;
Lowly bending at thy shrine,
Hail, thou Majesty divine!

Glorious Architect, above,
Source of Light, and source of Love;
Here thy light and love prevail,
Hail! Almighty Master, hail!

Still to us, O God! dispense
Tby divine benevolence;
Teach the tender tear to flow,
Melting at a brother's woe.

Heavenly Father, grant that we,
Blest with boundless charity
To the admiring world may prove,
Happy they who dwell in Love.

Join, oh earth; and as you roll,
East to West, from pole to pole,
Lift to him your grateful lays,
Join the universal praise.

52. BEAR HIM HOME.

Music: Hiram (Pg. 39, Concordia)

Bear him home, his bed is made
In the stillness of the shade;
Bear the Brother to his home;
Bear, oh, bear him home,
Home, where all his toils are o'er,
Home where journeying is no more,
Bear him home, no more to roam;
Bear the Brother home.

Lay him down — his bed is here —
See, the dead are resting near;
Lay the wanderer gently down;
Lay him gently down,
Lay him down, let nature spread,
Starry curtains over his head;
Gently lay our Brother down;
Gently lay him down.

Ah! not yet for us the bed,
Where the faithful pilgrim's laid!
Through life's weariness and woe,
Still our footsteps go,
Let us go, and on our way,
Faithful journey, faithful pray;
Boldly, Brother pilgrims, go!
Boldly let us go!

53. DEATH OF A BROTHER.

Music: Roberts. C.M. (Pg. 40, Concordia)

As, bowed by sudden storms, the rose
Sinks on the garden's breast,
Down to the grave our broth-er goes,
In silence there to rest.

No more with us his tuneful voice
The mystic hymn shall swell;
No more his cheerful heart rejoice,
When peals the Sabbath bell.

But far away, in cloudless sphere,
Amid a sinless throng,
He's joining, with celestial ear,
The everlasting song.

No more we'll mourn our absent friend,
But lift our earnest prayer,
That when our work of life shall end,
We all may join him there.

63. Funeral.

Music: as above (Pg. 41, Concordia)

What sounds of grief, in sadness, tell
A Brother's earthly doom,
No more in life's fair scenes to dwell,
A tenant of the tomb.

No more the friendly hand now pressed;
No gently whispered word;
He finds a long, unbroken rest,
Where rales his Heavenly Lord

All earthly joys and sorrows o'er,
Each changing hope or fear;
He sees the light of that fair shore
Without a sigh or tear.

Then bring to Him, whose only care
That better temple forms,
Our wish that all may gather there,
Beyond life's coming storms.

54. CORNER STONE.

Music: as above (Pg. 37, Concordia)
Words by Bro. Rob. Morris

Round the spot, Moriah's hill —
Masons meet with cheerful will;
Him who stood as King that day,
We as cheerfully obey;
Lord, we love thy glorious name,
Give the grace thou gavest me.

Round the spot thus chosen well,
Brothers, with fraternal hail
Gather in your mystic ring,
Mystic words, and joyful sing;
Lord, our hearts,our souls are thine,
On our labors deign to shine.

Round the spot may Plenty reign, —
Peace, with spirit ail benign;
Unity, the golden three —
Here their influence ever be.
Lord, these jewels of Thy store,
Send them bounteous, flowing o'er.

Round the spot where now we stand,
Soon will stand another band;
We to other worlds most go,
Called by Him we trust below.
Lord, thy spirit grant, that they,
All thy counsel may obey.

55. ANNIVERSARY ODE.

Music: Jerusalem. (Pg. 31, Concordia)

Arise! and blow thy trumpet, Fame!
Freemasonry aloud proclaim,
To realms and worlds unknown;
Tell them, 'twas this great David's son,
The wise, the matchless Solomon,
Prized far above his throne.

The solemn temples, cloud capt towers,
The aspiring domes, are works of ours,
By us those piles were raised:
Then bid mankind with songs advance,
And through the ethereal vast expanse,
Let Masonry be praised.

We help the poor in time of need,
The naked clothe, the hungry feed,
Tis our foundation stone:
We build upon the noblest plan,
For friendship rivets man to man,
And makes us all as one

Still louder, Fame! thy trumpet blow;
Let all the distant regions know
Freemasonry is this:
Almighty Wisdom gave it birth,
And Heaven has fixed it here on earth,
A type of future bliss!

56. ANNIVERSARY ODE.

(Pg. 32, Concordia)

Joyous, joyous, now each heart's emotion,
Ardent, ardent, be the souls devotion;
Swell the songs of grateful praise;
Welcome to this day of days!
Friendship, Friendship here is full as ocean.

Father, mother, of your love, ye mind us,
Brothers, brothers, to your hearts ye bind us;
Here we pledge our best return,
Love within our hearts shall burn,
Ever, ever there till death shall find us.

Spirit, boundless angels bow before thee;
Father, gracious! humbly we adore thee;
Raise we now our grateful song,
Thou our pleasures dost prolong,
Father! guide us, guide us, we implore thee.

57. DEDICATION.

Music: Old Hundred. (Pg. 33, Concordia)

Great Architect of Heaven and Earth,
To whom all nature owes its birth;
Thou spoke! and vast creation stood,
Surveyed the work — pronounced it good.

Lord, canst thou deign to own and bless
This humble dome, this sacred place?
Oh! let thy spirit's presence shine
Within these walls — this house of thine.

'Twas reared in honor of thy name;
Here kindle, Lord, the sacred flame:
Oh! make it burn in every heart,
And never from this place depart.

Lord, here the wants of all supply,
And fit our souls to dwell on high;
From service in this humble place,
Raise us to praise thee face to face.

68a. Hymn for Consecration.

Music: as above (Pg. 38, Concordia)

Master Supreme! accept our praise;
Still bless this consecrated band;
Parent of Light! illume our ways,
And guide us by thy sovereign hand.

May Faith, Hope, Charity, divine,
Here hold their undivided reign,
Friendship and Harmony combine
To soothe our cares, and banish pain.

May Wisdom here disciples find,
Beauty unfold her thousand charms;
Science invigorate the mind,
Expand the soul that virtue warms.

May Pity dwell within each breast
Relief attend the suffering poor;
Thousands by this, our Lodge, be blest,
Till worth, distrest, shall want no more.

58b. DEDICATION.

Music: Noble. (Pg. 34, Concordia)

Let there be Light! the Almighty spoke!
Refulgent streams from chaos broke,
To illume the rising earth!
Well pleased the great Jehovah stood,
The power supreme pronounced it good,
And gave the planets birth!
Chorus

In choral numbers let us join,
To bless and praise this light divine!

Parent of Lipht! accept our praise!
Who sheddest on us thy brightest rays,
The light that fills our mind!
By choice selected, lo! we stand,
By friendship joined a social band,
That love, that aid mankind.

The widow's tear, the orphan's cry,
All wants our ready hands supply,
As far as power is given;
The naked clothe, the prisoner free,
These are thy works, sweet Charity,
Revealed to us from Heaven.

59b. DEDICATION.

Music: Dort 6s & 4s. (Pg. 35, Concordia)

Thou! who art God alone,
Accept before thy throne,
Our fervent prayer!
To fill with light and grace,
This house, thy dwelling place,
And bless thy chosen race,
O God! draw near.

As through the universe,
All nature's works diverse,
Thy praise accord;
Let Faith upon as shine.
And Charity combine,
With Hope, to make us thine,
Jehovah! Lord.

Spirit of Truth and Love,
Descending from above,
Our hearts inflame;
Till Masonry's control
Shall build in one the whole,
A Temple of the soul
To thy great name.

71a. Laying Foundation Stone.

Music: as above (Pg. 36, Concordia)

Let Mason's fame resound
Through all the nations round,
From pole to pole;
See what felicity,
Harmless simplicity,
Like electricity,
Runs through the whole.

When in the Lodge we're met,
And in due order set,
Happy are we:
Faith, Hope, and Charity,
Love and Sincerity,
Friendship and Unity,
Are ever free.

Long may our Craft be free,
And may they ever be
Great, as of yore:
For many ages past
Masonry has stood fast,
And may its glory last
Till time's no more.

60b. Opening Ode.

Music: Anniversary (Pg. 30, Concordia)

Hail! brother masons, hail!
Let friendship long prevail,
And bind us fast.
May harmony and peace
Our happiness increase,
And friendship never cease,
While life doth last.

Sincerity and love,
Descendants from above,
Our minds employ;
Morality our pride,
And truth our constant guide,
With us are close allied,
And form our joy.

We on the level meet,
And every brother greet,
Skilled in our art:
And when our labor's past,
Each brother's hand we'll grasp
Then on the square at last,
Friendly we'll part.

May wisdom be our care,
And virtue from the square,
By which we live.
That we at last may join
The heavenly Lodge sublime,
Where shall perfection shine,
With God above.

61. Installation Ode.

(Pg. 29, Concordia)

Behold! in the East our new master appear,
Come brethen, we'll greet him with hearts all sincere.
Chorus

We'll serve him with freedom with fervor and zeal,
And aid him his dutics and trust to fulfil.
We'll aid him with freedom with fervor and zeal,
And help him his duties and trust to fulfil.

In the West see the warden with level in hand,
The master to aid and obey his command.

In the South see the warden by plumb stand upright.
Who watches the sun and takes note of his flight.

62. COME LET US JOIN IN CHEERFUL SONG.

Solo and Chorus.

Come let us join in cheerful song,
Our voices sounding free;
In joyful notes aloud prolong,
The praise of Masonry.
Let every voice unite and sing
The chorus loud and free,
And every heart just tribute bring
From mountain, land and sea.
Chorus

Then let us join in cheerful song,
Our voices sounding free;
In joyful notes aloud proclaim,
The praise of Masonry.

Come great and small, come old and young,
Come all ye accepted free;
Come every nation, every tongue,
And sing of Masonry.
Let Jew nor Gentile ever forget,
Our honors they may claim,
We're Brothers on the level met;
Whatever our land or name.

Let trusting Faith, and holy Hope,
And heaven-born Charity,
In every heart have largest scope,
And shine for Masonry.
Let Justice dircle, Virtue square,
Let Friendship guide our feet,
So, that at last, like jewels rare,
We all in heaven may meet.

64. A PLACE IN THE CIRCLE FOR ME.

Words by G.W. Chase.

A place in the circle for me,
An hour with compass and square;
Where the heart is light and free,
As the eagle in the air.
There is no place so dear,
There are no hearts so true,
As those we meet with here,
Though they be ever so few.

I come when the full orbed moon
Looks down from her station above;
I come to our chosen home,
With its friendship and brotherly love.
Herethe passions are subdued,
Within due bounds are seen,
Here jealousy and feud,
Never come our hearts between.

Where ever my feet may roam,
What ever my lot may be;
In spirit I oft will come,
To my place in the Lodge with thee;
In all the scenes below,
In pleasure or in pain,
My heart shall turn to you,
And I'll long to meet again.

65. MASONIC SONG.

When the sun from the East salutes mortal eyes,
And the skylark, melodiously bids us arise;
With our hearts full of joy we the summons obey,
And haste to our work at the dawn of the day.

On the Trestle our Master draws angles and lines,
There with freedom and fervency forms his designs;
Not a picture on earth is so lovely to view,
All his lines are so perfect, his angles so true.

In the West see the Wardens submissively stand,
The Master to aid, and obey his command;
The intent of his signal we perfectly know,
And we ne'er take offence when he gives us a blow,

In the Lodge, sloth and dullness we always avoid,
Fellow Crafts and Apprentices all are employed;
Perfect ashlers some furnish, some make the rough plain,
All are pleased with their work, and are pleased with their gain.

66. THE LODGE.

Music: The dearest spot is home.
Words by J.B. Taylor.

The sacred spot to Masons dear,
Is in the Lodge,
The place where dwells not strife or fear,
Is in the Lodge,
God's pure laws the craft revering,
Death they learn is ever nearing,
Yet it doth no useless tear bring,
Within the Lodge.

When Brothers on the level meet,
Within the Lodge,
And friends and neighbors kindly greet,
Within the Lodge,
Sacred rites and forms unite us,
Scripture truths to search incite us,
Virtue's course to lead invite us,
Within the Lodge.

All praise to our Great Master rise,
Within the Lodge,
Resound his praise from earth and skies,
Within the Lodge,
May each creature of his power,
When the clouds of fortune lower,
Aspirations raise each hour,
Within the Lodge.

67. OLD FRIENDS.

Old friends shall never be forgot,
Whose love was love sincere;
And still, whatever be their lot,
We'll make them welcome here.
The kindness they have often shown,
We long have borne in mind,
And long, we hope, our friends have known,
A welcome where to find.

It never shall be said, with truth,
That now our hearts are cold;
The friends who loved us in our youth,
We'll love when they are old.
And if in ills, which we withstand,
They kind assistance need,
We'll stretch them forth a helping hand,
And be a friend indeed.

68b. OPENING OF THE LODGE.

Words by Henry C. Cooper of Benevolent Lodge, No. 28.

Within thy Temple once again,
Great God! we seek thy face;
O, do not Thou our prayers disdain,
But fill us with thy grace.

Let Charity like oil, o'er-spread
Our every action here;
And may we, by thy goodness led,
Exclaim, "Our God is near."

Grand Master of the earth and sky,
Who art in Heaven above!
Teach us to feel that Thou art nigh,
And bless us by Thy love.

72a. Entered Apprentice.

Music: as above

While thee I seek, protecting Power!
Be my vain wishes stilled;
And may this consecrated hour
With better hopes be filled.

In every joy that crowns my days,
In every pain I bear,
My heart shall find delight in praise,
Or seek relief in prayer.

73a. Fellow Craft.

Music: as above (Pg. 23, Concordia)

Happy is he who trusts the Lord,
And follows his commands;
Who lends the poor without reward.
Or gives with liberal hands.

As pity dwells within his breast,
To all the sons of need,
So God shall answer his request,
With blessings on his seed.

69. CLOSING OF THE LODGE.

Words by Henry C. Cooper, Esq.

We thank Thee, God of boundless love,
For all thy mercies past;
May we so live, that Heaven above,
Shall be our home at last.

So may our lives consistent be,
That at the end we may
Behold Thy glorious majesty,
Through an eternal day.

Be with us Lord, whatever betide;
Protect us all our days;
And to thy name we will ascribe,
All honor, power and praise.

74a. Fellow Craft.

Music: as above (Pg. 23, Concordia)

Our vows, our prayers, we now present,
Before thy throne of grace:
God of our fathers! be the God
Of their succeeding race.

Oh! spread thy covering wings around,
Till till our wanderings cease,
And, at our Father's loved abode,
Our souls arrive in peace.

75a. Master Mason.

Music: as above

Few are thy days, and full of woe,
O man, of woman born;
Thy doom is written, "Dust thou art,
To dust thou shalt return."

Determined are the days that fly
Successive o'er thy head;
The numbered hour is on the wing,
That lays thee with the dead.

70. GOD SPEED THE RIGHT.

Brothers, sing with voice united,
Join we now with hearts delighted,
Lo! the winds in silence bearing,
Lo! all nature's voice proclaiming,
God speed the right!

Be ye firm, and be enduring,
Always in the right pursuing,
When all obstacles impede thee,
Trust in heaven for strength to aid thee,
God speed the right!

When life's conflicts all are over,
May we never prove faithless ever,
When all earthly ties are sundered,
When our days on earth are numbered,
God speed the right!

71b. SONG FOR THE TWENTY-FOURTH OF JUNE.

Words by Bro. C. Moore.

All hail! the twenty-fourth of June,
Another year has flown,
And on our altar glimmers yet,
The Light which long has shone,
Our brethren! ye are welcome here,
A truthful, noble band;
We're one in mystic bonds to day,
We're one in heart and hand.

On this, another festive day,
We meet as oft of yore,
And tell of mystic labors done,
On mountain vale and shore,
Of future work we yet may do,
Ere we are gathered home.
To hear from our Great Master's lips,
The welcome words — "well done."

How sad the thought on memory's page,
That some who once were here,
Have no place now but in our hearts.
They've reached a higher sphere;
But Hope points on to future years,
When, all our works complete,
The true, and tried and loved of earth
Together all shall meet.

Then hail the twenty-fourth of June,
Its memories all are dear;
And oft on festive days like this,
Through many a passing year.
We'll meet and grasp each other's hands,
Ere yet our work is done,
And, round our altars, closer draw,
The bonds which make us one.

72b. FRIENDS AND BROTHERS SWELL THE SONG.

Arranged from Franz Abt.—Switerland.

Friends and Brothers swell the song.
Every voice the strain prolong,
Join in chorus load and strong;
On to victory!
Lift our banners let them wave.
Onward still, the wretched save,
Smooth their pathway to the grave;
Be their friend indeed.

Give the aching bosom rest,
Carry joy to every breast,
Mnke the poor and needy blest;
Grant them kind relief:
Raise the glorious watchword high,
Love! Relief! and Charity!
Let the echo reach the sky,
Swelling joyfully.

God of mercy! hear us plead,
Help us while we intercede,
Oh, how many bosoms bleed;
Heal them speedily:
Hasten then the happy day,
When bneath thy gentle ray,
All the world shall own thy sway;
Reign triumphantly.

73b. MEEK AND LOWLY.

Music: Glover.

Meek and lowly, pure and holy,
Chief among the blessed three;
Turning sadness into gladness,
Heaven born art thou Charity!
Pity dwelleth in thy bosom,
Kindness reigneth o'er thy heart,
Genile thoughts alone can sway thee,
Judgment hath in thee no part.

Hoping ever, failing never;
Though decieved, believing still;
Long abiding, all confiding
To thy heavenly Father's will;
Never weary of well doing,
Never fearful of the end;
Claiming all mankind as brothers,
Thou dost all alike befriend.

74b. THE MASON'S HOME.

Music: Harmony. 11s.

Should the chances of life ever tempt me to roam,
In a Lodge of Freemason's I'll still find a home;
There the sweet smile of Friendship still welcomes each guest,
And Brotherly Love gives that welcome a zest.

When absent from Lodge, pleasure tempts me in vain,
I sigh for the moments of meeting again;
For Friendship and Harmony truly are there,
Where we meet on the level and part on the square.

There the soul binding union surely is known,
Which unites both the peasant and king on the throne;
There the rich and the poor on the level do meet,
And as Brothers, each other most cordially greet.

On the quicksands of life should a brother be thrown,
It is then that the friendship of brothers is known;
For the heart points the hand his distress to remove,
For our motto is "Kindness and Brotherly Love."

When the Master of all, from his star-studded throne,
Shall issue his mandate to summon us home;
May each brother be found to be duly prepared,
In the Grand Lodge above us, to meet his reward.

75b. GENTLY, LORD! OH! GENTLY LEAD US.

Music: Sylvan Grove. 5s & 7s.

Gently, Lord! Oh, gently lead us,
Through this pilgrimage of tears;
Through the changes thou hast decreed us.
Till our last great change appears:
When temptation's darts assail us,
When in devious paths we stray,
Let thy goodness never fail us,
Lead us in thy perfect way.

In the hour of pain and anguish,
In the hour when death draws near,
Suffer not our hearts to languish,
Suffer not our souls to fear;
And when mortal life is ended,
Bid us on thy bosom rest,
Till, by angel bands attended,
We awake among the blest.

76. OPENING CHANT.


76a. Opening.

Kind Father! hear our prayer, we bow before thy throne;
O may we find acceptance there, and peace before unknown,
Within these walls may Peace and Harmony be found;
May Faith and Charity increase, and Hope and Love abound.

76b. Opening.

Let songs of grateful praise from every Lodge arise;
Let every heart its tribute raise to God who rules the skies,
His mercy and his love are boundless as His name;
And all eternity shall prove, his truth remains the same.

76c. Opening.

Blest are the sons of peace, whose hearts and hopes are one;
Whose kind designs to serve and please, through all their actions run,
Blest is this happy place, where zeal and friendship meet;
Where Truth, and Love, and heavenly grace, make our communion sweet.
Thus on the heavenly hills may we be blest above;
Where joy, like morning dew distills, and all the air is love.

77. CHANT. No.2.

Single (Pg. 42, Concordia)


77a. Entered Apprentice.

Behold; how good and how pleasant it is,
For brethren to dwell together in unity;
'Tis like the precious ointment upon the head
That ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard that went down to the skirts of his garment.
As the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion;
For there the Lord commanded the blessing, even life forever more.

77b. Entered Apprentice.

Spirit of power and might! behold thy willing servant here;
With thy protection him infold, and free his heart from fear.
Though darksome skies may over him lower, and dangers fill the way;
Support him with thy gracious power, and be his constant stay.

77c. Opening.

Great God, behold before thy throne, a band of brothers lowly bend;
Thy sacred name we humbly own and pray that thou wilt be our friend
A band of brothers may we live, a band of brothers may we die;
To each may God, our Father, give a home of peace above the sky.

78a. CHANT. No.3.

Double, music by C.J. Hopkins
Words by Giles F. Yates

Behold! how pleasant and how good,
For brethren such as we,
Of the "Accepted" brotherhood,
To dwell in unity;

'Tis like the oil on Aaron's head
Which to his feet distils;
Like Hermon's dew, so richly shed
On Zion's sacred hills.

For there the Lord of light and love,
A blessing sent with power;
O, may we all this blessing prove,
Even life forever more.

78b. Entered Apprentice.

O, welcome, brother to our band,
Though strong its numbers now,
And high its lofty pillars stand,
And noble arches bow.
Oh welcome — if thy heart be true,
Thou'lt find with us a home;
We're daily adding columns new
Unto our glorious dome.
Now let our ardent prayers arise
For blessings on his brow
And bear our offering to the skies,
For him who joins us now.

79. CHANT. No.4.

Single (Pg. 42, Concordia)


79a. Fellow Craft.

Thus he shewed me: and behold,
The Lord stood upon a wall,
made by a plumb line,
with a plumb line in his hand;
And the Lord said unto me, Amos, what seest thou?
And I said a plumb line.
Then said the Lord, Behold,
I will set a plumb line in the midst of my people Israel,
I will not again pass by them any more.

79b. Fellow Craft.

Thus far the Lord has led me on;
Thus far his power prolongs my days;
And every ev'ning shall make known
Some fresh memorial of his grace.
O! may his love with sweet control,
Bind every passion of my soul;
Bid every vain desire depart,
And dwell for ever in my heart.

79c. Fellow Craft.

Brothers, faithful and deserving,
now the second rank you fill,
Purchased by your faultless serving,
leading to a higher still.
Thus from rank to rank ascending,
mounts the Mason's path of love;
Bright its earthly course, and ending
in the glorious Lodge above.

80. CHANT No.5.

Single (Pg. 43, Concordia)


80. Master Mason.

Remember, now thy Creator in the days of thy youth,
while the evil days come not,
Nor the years draw nigh, when thou shalt say,
I have no pleasure in them.
While the sun, or the light,
or the moon, or the stars be not darkened,
Nor the clouds return after the rain.
In the days when the keepers of the house shall tremble,
and the strong men shall bow themselves,
And the grinders cease, because they are few,
and those that look out of the windows be darkened,
And the doors shall be shut in the streets
when the sound of the grinding is low.
And he shall rise up at the voice of the bird,
and all the daughters of music shall be brought low;
And when they shall be afraid of that which is high,
And fears shall be in the way,
And the almond tree shall flourish,
and the grasshopper shall be a burden,
and desire shall fail.
Because, man goeth to his long home,
and the mourners go about the streets,
Or ever the silver chord be loosed,
or the golden bowl be broken;
Or, the pitcher be broken at the fountain,
or the wheel broken at the cistern;
Then shall the dust return to the earth, as it was,
And the spirit shall return unto God who gave it.

81. MASTER MASON. No.6.

Double Chant.

Let us remember, in our youth,
before the evil days draw nigh,
Our Great Creator, and his truth!
ere memory fail, and pleasure fly;
Or sun, or moon, or planet's light
grow dark, or clouds return in gloom:
Ere vital spark no more incite,
when strength shall bow, and years consume.

Let us in youth remember Him;
who formed our frame and spirits gave.
Ere windows of the mind grow dim,
or door of speech obstructed wave;
When voice of bird fresh terrors wake,
and music's daughters charm no more,
Or fear to rise with trembling shake,
along the path we travel o'er.

In youth, to God let memory cling,
before desire shall fail, or wane,
Or e'er be loosed life's silver string,
or bowl at fountain rent in twain;
For man to his long home doth go,
and mourners group around his urn;
Our dust to dust again must flow,
and spirits unto God return.

MISCELLANEOUS MUSIC.



82-83. AUTUMN LEAVES.

Chorus

Autumn leaves, Autumn leaves,
Lie strewn around me here,
Autumn leaves, Autumn leaves,
How sad! how cold! how drear;

How like the hopes of childhood's day
Thick clustering on the bough,
How like those hopes is their decay,
How faded are they now;

Autumn leaves, withered leaves,
That fly before the gale,
Withered leaves, withered leaves,
To tell a mournful tale,
Of love once true and friends once kind
And happy moments fled,
Dispelled by every breath of wind,
Forgotten, changed, or dead;

84-88. LARBOARD WATCH.

Duet
Composed by T. Williams.

At dreary midnight's cheerless hour,
Deserted even by Cynthia's beams,
When tempests beat and torrents pour,
And twinkling stars no longer gleam;
The wearied Sailor spent with toil,
Clings firmly to the weather shrouds.
And still the lengthened hour to guile,
Sings as he views the gathering clouds,
Chorus

Larboard Watch Ahoy! Larboard Watch Ahoy!
But who can speak the joy he feels,
While o'er the foam his vessel reels,
And his tired eyelids slumbering fall?
He rouses at the welcome call
of Larboard Watch Ahoy!

With anxious care he eyes each wave,
That swelling threatens to o'erwhelm,
And his storm beaten bark to save,
Directs with skill and faithfal helm.
With joy he drinks the cheering grog,
'Mid storms that bellow loud and hoarse,
With joy he heaves the reeling log,
And marks the leeway and the course,

89-93. OUR WAY ACROSS THE SEA.

Music: Swiss air.

Home, fare thee well! the ocean's storm is o'er,
The weary pennon woos the seaward wind;
Fast speeds the bark, and now the lessening shore
Sinks in the wave, with those we leave behind.
Fare thee well!
Land of the free;
No tongue can tell
the love I bear to thee.

We wreath no bowl to drink a gay good bye,
For tears would fall unbidden in the wine,
And while reflected was the mournful eye,
The sparkling surface even would cease to shine.
Fare thee well!
Once more, once more,
The ocean's swell,
Now hides my natire shore.

See where yon star its Diamond light displays,
Now seen, now hid behind the swelling sail,
Hope rides in gladness on its streaming rays,
And bids us on, and bribes the favoring gale.
Then Hope we bend
In joy to thee;
And careless wend
Our way across the sea.

94-96. LADY OF BEAUTY.

O Lady, sweet Lady, unveil those eyes;
The stars are dim, the moon is gone,
This hour's for love, for love alone.
O hear its sighs.

Lady of beauty, away, away,
Roses will fade as time flies on;
Weep when you must, but now be gay,
Life is too short to be sighing on,

97-99. A LITTLE FARM WELL TILLED.

TRIO

A little farm well tilled,
a little cot well filled,
a little wife well willed, give me, give me.

A larger farm well tilled,
a bigger house well filled,
a taller wife well willed, give me, give me.

I like the farm well tilled,
And I like the house well filled,
But no wife at all give me, give me.

A short wife, a short wife,
a short wife give me, give me.

A tall wife, a tall wife,
a tall wife give me, give me.

No wife at all give me, give me,
no wife at all give me, give me.

100-101. THE WANDERER'S FAREWELL.

Popular German Student's Song.

The sails are all swelling, the streamers float gay,
The anchor is rising, and I must away;
Adieu, my dear mountains, Adieu, my dear home!
I turn from your threshhold, 'mid strangers to roam.

The sun through the heavens e'er hastes to the west;
The waves of the ocean are never at rest;
The bird, with its pinions unfettered and free,
Careers in its freedom over mountain and sea.

Adieu, dearest mother! dear sister, adieu!
I go where the skies are all shining and blue,
Where flowers ever blossom, where birds ever sing.
Where fruit loads the branches from harvest to Spring.

When far in the land of the stranger I see,
Dear Mary, the flowers I planted for thee,
And when the sweet songsters repeat in my ear
The notes we together have lingered to hear —

And when, on the shore of that region of gold,
I fancy the waves round thy footsteps have rolled,
The wavelets, the birds, and the flowers where I roam
Will bring you before me, and make me a home!

102-103. SWEET EVENING HOURS.

Music by William S. Leonard.

How sweet were those soft evening hours,
When wreathed with the bright blooming flowers;
Our boat gently floated along.
The soft shades of twilight were o'er us,
The bright West was blushing before us,
And glancing the wavelets among.

One star, lovely Hesper, was beaming.
And deep in the blue waters gleaming,
Shone back like a Hesper below,
The toil of the woodman was ending,
The song of the reaper suspended,
And birds twittered sleepy and slow.

Night slowly around us was closing,
And in the deep silence reposing,
With quiet enjoyment were blessed,
The moon rising bright o'er the mountain,
Uplifted our hearts to the Fountain
Of beauty and pleasure and rest.

103-104. LUTZOW'S WILD HUNT.

For Male Voices.
C.M. VonWeber.

From yonder dark forest what horseman advance?
What sounds from the rocks are rebounding?
The sunbeams are gleaming on sword and on lance,
And loud the shrill trumpet is sounding,
And if you ask what you there behold, —
'Tis the hunt of Lutzow the free and the bold.

Why roars in yonder valley the deadly fight?
What glittering swords are clashing?
Our true hearted riders maintain the right,
And the torch of freedom is flashing.
And if you ask what you there behold, —
'Tis the hunt, of Lutzow the free and the bold.

'Tis our hunt! the proud tyrant and dastardly slave;
Before our banters are flying;
And weep not for us, if our country we save,
Although we have saved it dying,
From age to age it shall it shall still be told —
'Tis the hunt of Lutzow the free and the bold.

105. OH, SWEET WAS THE HOUR.

Music: Italian.

Oh, sweet was the hour,
when first, dearest maid,
Beside thy loved bower
together we strayed;
The time, ah! remember,
'twas rapture to me,
The sun his last ember
had quenched in the sea.

The farewells of even
stole o'er us like balm.
And airs, as of heaven,
breathed by in the calm;
While softly came pealing
the anthem afar,
Of the mariners' hailing
their new lighted star.

The chime of devotion
then thrilled o'er the tide,
And deeply old ocean
in murmurs replied:
Then died that sad measure
and left a control,
A silence, a pleasure,
that melted the soul,

The region seemed hallowed,
I caught thy faint sigh;
And there tremblingly followed
a tear from thine eye:
Oh! never was love spoken
with charm so divine!
'Twas the first tender token
that Ada was mine.

106-109. THE CEREMONY OBSERVED AT FUNERALS.

The ceremonies which are observed on the occasion of funerals are highly appropriate; they're performed as a melancholy Masonic duty, and as a token of respect and affection to the memory of a departed brother. No mason can be interred with the formalities of the Order, unless he has been advanced to the third degree. Fellow Crafts and Apprentices are not entitled to funeral obsequies. All the brethren who walk in procession, should observe, as much as possible, an uniformity in their dress; black clothes, with white gloves and aprons, are most suitable.

The brethren being assembled at the Lodge room, (or some other convenient place,) the presiding officer opens the lodge in the third degree; and having stated the purpose of the meeting, a procession is then formed, which moves to the house of the deceased, and from thance to the place of interment.

ORDER OF PROCESSION AT A FUNERAL
Tyler, with drawn Sword;
Stewards, with White Rods;
Musicians, (if they are Masons,) otherwise they follow the Tyler;
Master Masons;
Senior and Junior Deacons;

Marshal

Secretary and Treasurer;
Senior and Junior Wardens;
Mark Masters;
Past Masters;
Royal Arch Masons;
Select Masters;
Knights Templars;
The Holy Writings, on a cushion, covered with black cloth,
carried by the oldest (or some suitable) member of the Lodge;
The Master;
Clergy;
The Body with the insignia placed thereon,
Pall Bearers.

Note — If a past or present Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, or Grand Warden, should join the procession of a private lodge, proper attention is to be paid to them. They take place after tho Master of the lodge. Two Deacons, with black rods, are appointed by the Master to attend a Grand Warden; and when the Grand Master or Deputy Grand Master is present, the Book of Constitutions is borne before him, a Sword Bearer follows him, and the Deacons, with black rods, on his right and left.

When the procession arrives at the place of interment, the members of the lodge form a circle round the grave; the officers take their position at the head of the grave and the mourners at the foot. The following exhortation is then given:

FUNERAL SERVICE AT THE GRAVE.

Brethren: —

The solemn notes that betoken the dissolution of this earthly tabernacle, have again alarmed our outer door, and another spirit has been summoned to the land where our fathers have gone before us. Again we are called to assemble among the habitations of the dead, to behold the "narrow house appointed for all living." Here, around us, in that peace which the world cannot give, sleep the unnumbered dead. The gentle breeze fans their verdant covering, they heed it not; the sunshine and the storm pass over them, and they are not disturbed; stones and lettered monuments symbolize the affection of surviving friends, yet no sound proceeds from them, save that silent but thrilling admonition, "seek ye the narrow path and the straight gate that lead onto eternal life."

We are again called upon to consider the uncertainty of human life; the immutable certainty of death, and the vanity of all human pursuits. Decrepitude and decay are written upon every living thing. The cradle and the coffin stand in juxtaposition to each other; and it is a melancholy truth, that so soon as we begin to live, that moment also we begin to die. It is passing strange, that notwithstanding the daily mementoes of mortality that cross our path; notwithstanding the funeral bell so often tolls in our ears, and the "mournful procession" go about our streets, that we will not more seriously consider our approaching fate. We go on from design to design, add hope to hope, and lay out plans for the employment of many years, until we are suddenly alarmed at the approach of the Messenger of Death, at a moment when we least expect him, and which we probably conclude to be the meridian of our existence.

What, then, are all the externals of human dignity, the power of wealth, the dreams of ambition, the pride of intellect, or the charms of beauty, when Nature has paid her just debt? Fix your eyes on the last sad scene, and view life stript of its ornaments, and exposed in its natural meanness, and you must be persuaded of the utter emptiness of these delusions. In the grave all fallacies are detected, all ranks are leveled, and all distinctions are done away.

While we drop the sympathetic tear over the grave of our deceased brother, let us cast around his foibles, what ever they may have been, the broad mantle of masonic charity, nor withhold from his memory the commendation that his virtues claim at our hands. Perfection on earth has never yet been attained; the wisest, as well as the best of men, have gone astray. Suffer, then, the apologies of human nature to plead for him who can no longer extenuate for himself.

Our present meeting and proceedings will have been vain and useless, if they fail to excite our serious reflections, and strengthen our resolutions of amendment. Be then persuaded, my brethren, by the uncertainly of human life, and the unsubstantial nature of all its pursuits, and no longer postpone the all-important concern of preparing for eternity. Let us each embrace the present moment, and while time and opportunity offer, prepare for that great change, when the pleasures of the world shall be as poison to our lips, and happy reflections of a well spent life afford the only consolation. Thus shall our hopes be not frustrated, nor we hurried unprepared into the presence of that all wise and powerful Judge, to whom the secrets of every heart are known. Let us resolve to maintain with greater assiduity the dignified character of our profession. May our faith be evinced in a correct moral walk and deportment; may our hope be bright as the glorious mysteries that will be revealed hereafter; and our charity boundless as the wants of our fellow creatures. And having faithfully discharged the great duties which we owe to God, to our neighbor and ourselves; when at last it shall please the Grand Master of the universe to summon us into his eternal presence, may the trestle-board of our whole lives pass such inspection that it may be given unto each of us to "eat of the hidden manna," and to receive the "white stone with a new name written" that will ensure perpetual and unspeakable happiness at his right hand.

The Master then presenting the apron continues.

"The lamb-skin or white apron, is the emblem of innocence, and the badge of a Mason. It it more ancient than the golden fleece or Roman eagle; more honorable than the star and garter, when worthily worn."

The Master then deposits it in the grave.

This emblem I now deposit in the grave of our deceased brother. By it we are reminded of the universal dominion of Death. The arm of Friendship cannot interpose to prevent his coming; the wealth of the world cannot purchase our release; nor will the innocence of youth, or the charms of beauty propitiate his purpose. The mattock, the coffin, and the melancholy grave, admonish us of our mortality, and that, sooner or later, these frail bodies must moulder in their parent dust.

The Master, holding the evergreen, continues.

This evergreen, which once marked the temporary resting place of the illustrious dead, is an emblem of our faith in the immortality of the soul. By this we are reminded that we have an immortal part within us, that shall survive the grave, and which shall never, never, never die. By it we are admonished, that, though like our brother, whose remains lie before us, we shall soon be clothed in the habiliments of Death and deposited in the silent tomb, yet, through the merits of a divine and ascended Saviour, we may confidently hope that our souls will bloom in eternal spring.

The brethren then move in procession round the place of interment, and severally drop the sprig of evergreen into the grave; after which, the public grand Honors are given. The Master then continues the ceremony at the grave, in the following words:

From time immemorial, it has been the custom among the fraternity of free and accepted Masons, at the request of a brother, to accompany his corpse to the place of interment, and there to deposit his remains with the usual formalities.

In conformity to this usage, and at the request of our deceased brother, whose memory we revere, and whose loss we now deplore, we have assembled in the character of Masons, to offer up to his memory, before the world, the last tribute of our affection; thereby demonstrating the sincerity of our past esteem for him, and our steady attachment to the principles of the order.

The Great Creator having been pleased, out of his infinite mercy, to remove our brother from the cares and troubles of this transitory existence, to a state of endless duration, thus severing another link from the fraternal chain that binds us together; may we, who survive him, be more strongly oemented in the ties of union and friendship; that, during the short space alloted us here, we may wisely and usefully employ our time; and, in the reciprocal intercourse of kind and friendly acts, mutually promote the welfare and happiness of each other. Unto the grave we have consigned the body of our deceased brother; earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust; there to remain till the trump shall sound on the resurrection morn. We can cheerfully leave him in the hands of a Being, who has done all things well; who is glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders.

To those of his immediate relatives and friends, who are most heart stricken at the loss we have all sustained, we have but little of this world's consolation to offer. We can only sincerely, deeply and most affectionately sympathize with them in their afflictive bereavement. But in the beautiful spirit of the Christian's theology we dare to say, that He, who "tempers tho wind to the shorn lamb," looks down with infinite compassion upon the widow and the fatherless, in the hour of their desolation; and that the same benevolent Saviour, who wept while on earth, will fold the arms of his love and protection around those who put their trust in Him.

Then let us improve this solemn warning that at last, when the "sheeted dead" are stirring, when the "great white throne" is set, we shall receive from the Omniscient Judge, the thrilling invitation, "Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world."


109. FUNERAL HYMN.

Music: Pleyel's Hymn. (same as 51)

Solemn strikes the funeral chime,
Notes of our departing time,
As we journey here below,
Through a pilgrimage of woe.

Mortals now indulge a tear,
For mortality is here,
See how wide her trophies wave,
Over the slumbers of the grave.

Here another guest we bring,
Seraphs of celestial wing,
To our funeral altar come,
Waft our friend and brother home.

Lord of all below, above,
Fill our souls with Truth and Love,
As dissolves our earthly tie.
Take us to thy Lodge on high.

The service is here concluded with the following, or some suitable prayer: Almighty and most merciful Father, we adore thee as the God of time and of eternity. As it has pleased thee to take from the light of our abode, one dear to our hearts, we beseech thee to bless and sanctify unto us this dispensation of thy Providence. Inspire our hearts with wisdom from on high, that we may glorify thee in all our ways. May we realize that thine All-seeing Eye is upon us, and be influenced by the spirit of truth and love to perfect obedience, — that we may enjoy the divine approbation here below. And when our toils on earth shall have ceased, may we be raised to the enjoyment of fadeless light and immortal life in that kingdom where faitb and hope shall end — and love and joy prevail through eternal ages.

And thine, O righteous Father, shall be the glory forever. Amen.

Thus the service ends, and the procession returns in form to the plnce whence it set out, when the necessary duties are oomplied with, and the business of Masonry is renewed. The insignia and ornaments of the deoeased, if an officer of a lodge, are returned to the Master, with the usual ceremonies.



110. INDEX TO SUBJECTS.

ENTERED APPRENTICE.
Pages 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 68.
FELLOW CRAFT.
Pages 7. 11. 12.13.14.68. 69.
MASTER MASON.
Pages 5.11.15. 16.17. 18. 19. 20. 69.
OPENING.
Pages 13. 18. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31 32. 33. 34. 68.
CLOSING.
Pages 8. 9. 14. 15. 22. 29. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39 40 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.69.
FUNERAL.
Pages 51. 52. 53.
INSTALLATION.
Pages 19. 51. 60. 61.
DEDICATION.
Pages 57. 58. 59.
ANNIVERSARY.
Pages 20. 55. 56.
CORNER STONE.
Pages 54. 59.
CONSECRATION.
Page 57.
MISCELLANEOUS MASONIC MUSIC,
Page 62 to 75.
CHANTS.
Page 76 to 81.
MISCELLANEOUS MUSIC.
Page 82 to 105.

111. INDEX TO MUSIC.

Anderson13
Alida17
Allendale28
America29 & 60
Arlington8
Auld Lang Syne6
Autumn Leaves82
A little farm well tilled97
Balerma11
Bonnie Doon16
Case47
Condit26
Chant No.176
    "          .277
    "          .378
    "          .479
    "          .580
    "          .681
Dort59
Dundee6
Evening41
Gamble43
God speed the right70
Good night42
Hartshorn9
Hamilton15
Harmony74
Hamburg20
Hebron19
Hiram62
Home again24
Home, sweet home38
Jerusalem65
Larboard Watch84
Lady of Beauty49
Lutzow's Wild Hunt103
Mant23
Marshall89
Manhattan40
Masonic Song66
Meek and Lowly78
My Mother dear89
Nashville48
Nearer my God to thee60
New York14
Newark21
Noble68
Oh, sweet was the hour106
Old Hundred67
Old Friends67
Our way across the sea89
Pleyel's Hymn61
Rose of Allendale34
Rockwell83
Roberts63
Sheville49
Silver Stream25
Sicilian Hymn13
Scots Wha Hae46
Song for the Twenty Fourth of June71
Sylvan Grove7
Sweet Evening Hours102
Tappan7
The dearest spot is home66
The level and the square44
The wanderer's farewell100
Uxbridge10
Waterman31
Walnut Grove31
Welton18
Wood23
Woodruff37

INDEX OF FIRST LINES.

In Alphabetical Order

97-99. A little farm well tilled,
64. A place in the circle for me,
71b. All hail! the twenty-fourth of June,
7a. Almighty Father! God of love —
23a. Almighty Father! gracious Lord!
45b. An hour with you, an hour with you,
55. Arise! and blow thy trumpet, Fame!
53. As, bowed by sudden storms, the rose
9b. As from this place we go once more,
28. As morning breeze in balmy spring,
41. As the evening shades descending,
84-88. At dreary midnight's cheerless hour,
82-83. Autumn leaves, Autumn leaves,
52. Bear him home, his bed is made
77a. Behold; how good and how pleasant it is,
8. Behold how pleasant and how good,
78a. Behold! how pleasant and how good,
61. Behold! in the East our new master appear,
76c. Blest are the sons of peace, whose hearts and hopes are one;
26. Brethren all, wherever you be,
59a. Brothers, ere tonight we part,
13b. Brothers faithful and deserving,
79c. Brothers, faithful and deserving,
70. Brothers, sing with voice united,
50. Brothers, we meet again,
40b. Come, Brothers Accepted, come join in our song;
18a. Come, brothers, ere tonight we part,
32b. Come, Brothers of the plumb and square,
12. Come, Craftsmen, assembled our pleasure to share,
62. Come let us join in cheerful song,
19. Dangers of every form attend
20b. Death like an ever flowing stream,
9a. Far from the world's cold strife and pride,
38. Farewell, till again, we shall welcome the time
13a. Few are thy days and full of woe,
75a. Few are thy days, and full of woe,
72b. Friends and Brothers swell the song.
46. Friends the parting hour has come,
103-104. From yonder dark forest what horseman advance?
75b. Gently, Lord! Oh, gently lead us,
29b. Glad hearts to thee we bring,
42. Good night, good night, and peace be with you,
57. Great Architect of Heaven and Earth,
25a. Great God, behold before thy throne,
77c. Great God, behold before thy throne, a band of brothers lowly bend;
18b. Great God! wilt thou meet with us here,
60b. Hail! brother masons, hail!
29a. Hail! Masonry, thou craft divine!
73a. Happy is he who trusts the Lord,
15. Hear my prayer! Jehovah hear!
16a. Heavenly Father, deign to bless us,
23b. Heavenly Father, gently bless us,
20a. Heavenly Parent! ere we part,
48b. Heavenly Parent! ere we part,
22. Holy Lord, lend now thine ear,
33a. Holy Spirit, from on high,
89-93. Home, fare thee well! the ocean's storm is o'er,
25b. How pleasant 'tis to see
102-103. How sweet were those soft evening hours,
30. How sweet when shades of even
39. How sweet when shades of evening
56. Joyous, joyous, now each heart's emotion,
76a. Kind Father! hear our prayer, we bow before thy throne;
27a. Let Masons ever live in love;
71a. Let Mason's fame resound
76b. Let songs of grateful praise from every Lodge arise;
58b. Let there be Light! the Almighty spoke!
16b. Let us remember in our youth,
81. Let us remember, in our youth, before the evil days draw nigh,
47a. Lo! the day at last declineth,
45a. Lo! the day of rest declineth,
21. Lord we come before thee now,
68a. Master Supreme! accept our praise;
11b. May our united hearts expand,
73b. Meek and lowly, pure and holy,
24. Met again, met again, in this loved retreat;
47b. Now our festive joys are ending,
7b. Now we must close our labors here,
35. Now we part! what sad emotion
27b. Now while evening shades are falling.
34. O God we lift our hearts to thee,
94-96. O Lady, sweet Lady, unveil those eyes;
6. O, welcome brother to our band,
5. O, welcome, brother, to our band,
78b. O, welcome, brother to our band, though strong its numbers now,
105. Oh, sweet was the hour,
67. Old friends shall never be forgot,
37. Our social labors now we close,
74a. Our vows, our prayers, we now present,
48a. Part in peace! with deep thanksgiving,
80. Remember, now thy Creator in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not,
54. Round the spot, Moriah's hill —
74b. Should the chances of life ever tempt me to roam,
32a. Softly now the light of day
58a. Softly now the light of day
51. Solemn strikes the funeral chime,
109. Solemn strikes the funeral chime,
36. Soon we part, let kind affection
1. Spirit of power and might! behold,
77b. Spirit of power and might! behold thy willing servant here;
40a. Spirit of truth and love,
10. Supreme Grand Master! God of power,
2. Teach me the measure of my days,
17. The Lord unto thy prayer attend,
66. The sacred spot to Masons dear,
100-101. The sails are all swelling, the streamers float gay,
59b. Thou! who art God alone,
14. Thus far the Lord has led me on,
79b. Thus far the Lord has led me on;
79a. Thus he shewed me: and behold,
60a. Unto thee, Great God, belong
49. We have met in peace together,
44. We meet upon the Level and we part upon the Square.
69. We thank Thee, God of boundless love,
33b. What joy when Brethren dwell combined,
63. What sounds of grief, in sadness, tell
31. When the light of day is winging,
65. When the sun from the East salutes mortal eyes,
11a. While journeying on our homeward way,
72a. While thee I seek, protecting Power!
68b. Within thy Temple once again,

INDEX OF FIRST LINES.

In Presentation Order

1. Spirit of power and might! behold,
2. Teach me the measure of my days,
6. O, welcome brother to our band,
7a. Almighty Father! God of love —
5. O, welcome, brother, to our band,
8. Behold how pleasant and how good,
7b. Now we must close our labors here,
9a. Far from the world's cold strife and pride,
9b. As from this place we go once more,
10. Supreme Grand Master! God of power,
11a. While journeying on our homeward way,
11b. May our united hearts expand,
13a. Few are thy days and full of woe,
12. Come, Craftsmen, assembled our pleasure to share,
13b. Brothers faithful and deserving,
16a. Heavenly Father, deign to bless us,
14. Thus far the Lord has led me on,
18a. Come, brothers, ere tonight we part,
15. Hear my prayer! Jehovah hear!
20a. Heavenly Parent! ere we part,
16b. Let us remember in our youth,
17. The Lord unto thy prayer attend,
23a. Almighty Father! gracious Lord!
18b. Great God! wilt thou meet with us here,
25a. Great God, behold before thy throne,
19. Dangers of every form attend
27a. Let Masons ever live in love;
20b. Death like an ever flowing stream,
29a. Hail! Masonry, thou craft divine!
21. Lord we come before thee now,
22. Holy Lord, lend now thine ear,
32a. I Softly now the light of day
33a. Holy Spirit, from on high,
23b. Heavenly Father, gently bless us,
24. Met again, met again, in this loved retreat;
25b. How pleasant 'tis to see
26. Brethren all, wherever you be,
27b. Now while evening shades are falling.
28. As morning breeze in balmy spring,
29b. Glad hearts to thee we bring,
40a. Spirit of truth and love,
30. How sweet when shades of even
31. When the light of day is winging,
32b. Come, Brothers of the plumb and square,
33b. What joy when Brethren dwell combined,
34. O God we lift our hearts to thee,
35. Now we part! what sad emotion
45a. Lo! the day of rest declineth,
36. Soon we part, let kind affection
47a. Lo! the day at last declineth,
48a. Part in peace! with deep thanksgiving,
37. Our social labors now we close,
38. Farewell, till again, we shall welcome the time
39. How sweet when shades of evening
40b. Come, Brothers Accepted, come join in our song;
41. As the evening shades descending,
42. Good night, good night, and peace be with you,
45b. An hour with you, an hour with you,
44. We meet upon the Level and we part upon the Square.
46. Friends the parting hour has come,
47b. Now our festive joys are ending,
48b. Heavenly Parent! ere we part,
58a. Softly now the light of day
59a. Brothers, ere tonight we part,
49. We have met in peace together,
50. Brothers, we meet again,
51. Solemn strikes the funeral chime,
60a. Unto thee, Great God, belong
52. Bear him home, his bed is made
53. As, bowed by sudden storms, the rose
63. What sounds of grief, in sadness, tell
54. Round the spot, Moriah's hill —
55. Arise! and blow thy trumpet, Fame!
56. Joyous, joyous, now each heart's emotion,
57. Great Architect of Heaven and Earth,
68a. Master Supreme! accept our praise;
58b. Let there be Light! the Almighty spoke!
59b. Thou! who art God alone,
71a. Let Mason's fame resound
60b. Hail! brother masons, hail!
61. Behold! in the East our new master appear,
62. Come let us join in cheerful song,
64. A place in the circle for me,
65. When the sun from the East salutes mortal eyes,
66. The sacred spot to Masons dear,
67. Old friends shall never be forgot,
68b. Within thy Temple once again,
72a. While thee I seek, protecting Power!
73a. Happy is he who trusts the Lord,
69. We thank Thee, God of boundless love,
74a. Our vows, our prayers, we now present,
75a. Few are thy days, and full of woe,
70. Brothers, sing with voice united,
71b. All hail! the twenty-fourth of June,
72b. Friends and Brothers swell the song.
73b. Meek and lowly, pure and holy,
74b. Should the chances of life ever tempt me to roam,
75b. Gently, Lord! Oh, gently lead us,
76a. Kind Father! hear our prayer, we bow before thy throne;
76b. Let songs of grateful praise from every Lodge arise;
76c. Blest are the sons of peace, whose hearts and hopes are one;
77a. Behold; how good and how pleasant it is,
77b. Spirit of power and might! behold thy willing servant here;
77c. Great God, behold before thy throne, a band of brothers lowly bend;
78a. Behold! how pleasant and how good,
78b. O, welcome, brother to our band, though strong its numbers now,
79a. Thus he shewed me: and behold,
79b. Thus far the Lord has led me on;
79c. Brothers, faithful and deserving,
80. Remember, now thy Creator in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not,
81. Let us remember, in our youth, before the evil days draw nigh,
82-83. Autumn leaves, Autumn leaves,
84-88. At dreary midnight's cheerless hour,
89-93. Home, fare thee well! the ocean's storm is o'er,
94-96. O Lady, sweet Lady, unveil those eyes;
97-99. A little farm well tilled,
100-101. The sails are all swelling, the streamers float gay,
102-103. How sweet were those soft evening hours,
103-104. From yonder dark forest what horseman advance?
105. Oh, sweet was the hour,
109. Solemn strikes the funeral chime,

Author Index

Most songs were uncredited, this list only includes those with the writer listed.